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While dressmaking was still a moneymaker, Schiaparelli went into the perfume business. which proved far more profitable. For a separate perfume business, also housed at the same address, Schiaparelli designs bottles, labels, and boxes for “Shocking", “Salut", “Le Roi Soleil”, “Zut," and other perfumes. In 1934 launched Soucis, Salut & Schiap.  'S' in 1928 all created in England by George Robert Parkinson.

While dressmaking was still a moneymaker, Schiaparelli went into the perfume business. which proved far more profitable. For a separate perfume business, also housed at the same address, Schiaparelli designs bottles, labels, and boxes for “Shocking", “Salut", “Le Roi Soleil”, “Zut," and other perfumes. In 1934 launched Soucis, Salut & Schiap. 'S' in 1928 all created in England by George Robert Parkinson.

Schiaparelli dubbed Chanel "that dreary little bourgeoise" and Chanel referred to her as "that Italian artist who makes clothes". In 1927, she opened her first salon, "pour le Sport" which launched a line featuring bathing and ski suits.  Evening wear and costume jewelrly were added.

Schiaparelli dubbed Chanel "that dreary little bourgeoise" and Chanel referred to her as "that Italian artist who makes clothes". In 1927, she opened her first salon, "pour le Sport" which launched a line featuring bathing and ski suits. Evening wear and costume jewelrly were added.

Chanel vs. Schiaparelli "Of course they were rivals, privately damning each other with faint praise.

Chanel vs. Schiaparelli "Of course they were rivals, privately damning each other with faint praise.

Her best-known perfume was "Shocking!" (1936), contained in a bottle sculpted by Leonor Fini in the shape of a woman's torso inspired by Mae West's tailor's dummy and Dalí paintings of flower-sellers. The packaging, also designed by Fini, was in shocking pink, one of Schiaparelli's signature colors which was said to have been inspired by Daisy Fellowe's 'Tête de Belier' (Ram's Head) pink diamond from Cartier. The fragrance was re-launched in 1998.

Her best-known perfume was "Shocking!" (1936), contained in a bottle sculpted by Leonor Fini in the shape of a woman's torso inspired by Mae West's tailor's dummy and Dalí paintings of flower-sellers. The packaging, also designed by Fini, was in shocking pink, one of Schiaparelli's signature colors which was said to have been inspired by Daisy Fellowe's 'Tête de Belier' (Ram's Head) pink diamond from Cartier. The fragrance was re-launched in 1998.

The Skeleton Dress, by Elsa Schiaparelli. 1938 the dress is so constricted that it became a second skin and the imitation anatomy sat  on the fine matt silk surface. Schiaparelli exaggerated the trapunto quilting technique to make enormous 'bones' - the design was stitched in outline through two layers of fabric, then cotton wadding inserted through the back to bring the design into relief on the front. The shoulder seams and right side are closed by bold plastic zips.

The Skeleton Dress, by Elsa Schiaparelli. 1938 the dress is so constricted that it became a second skin and the imitation anatomy sat on the fine matt silk surface. Schiaparelli exaggerated the trapunto quilting technique to make enormous 'bones' - the design was stitched in outline through two layers of fabric, then cotton wadding inserted through the back to bring the design into relief on the front. The shoulder seams and right side are closed by bold plastic zips.

schiaparelli shoe hat 1937/38 she designed from a sketch by Salvador Dalí. Dalí, Jean Cocteau and Albert Giacometti collaborated on designs with her.

schiaparelli shoe hat 1937/38 she designed from a sketch by Salvador Dalí. Dalí, Jean Cocteau and Albert Giacometti collaborated on designs with her.

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