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Attributed to Isaac Oliver (1556–1617) or Attributed to Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger (1561-1636) —   The Rainbow Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I, 1600-1602 (722×1023)

Attributed to Isaac Oliver (1556–1617) or Attributed to Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger (1561-1636) — The Rainbow Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I, 1600-1602 (722×1023)

Anne Boleyn by the 17th century artist Frans Pourbus. This was painted a century after her death. The increasing romanticization of her image was largely the result of her daughter Queen Elizabeth's phenomenal popularity.

Anne Boleyn by the 17th century artist Frans Pourbus. This was painted a century after her death. The increasing romanticization of her image was largely the result of her daughter Queen Elizabeth's phenomenal popularity.

Elizabeth I during the late 1590s

Queen Elizabeth I., circa late Possibly one of the portraits done for distribution, with Her Majesty's approval. So popular and in demand were her portraits, Elizabeth permitted mass production of her image, for the people.

Elizabeth I as you've never seen her before: Portrait showing off her wrinkles goes on display The work portrays Elizabeth I in her sixties  It was painted by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger in the late 16th century

Elizabeth I as you've never seen her before: Portrait showing off her wrinkles goes on display

Elizabeth I as you've never seen her before: Portrait showing off her wrinkles goes on display The work portrays Elizabeth I in her sixties It was painted by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger in the late 16th century

It is often said that we do not know how Elizabeth I felt about her mother, Anne Boleyn, and it is widely written that she only spoken of her twice in her entire life...Using a surprising amount of contemporary evidence and a little bit of conjecture based on fact, we can, in fact determine how Elizabeth felt about Anne.-BB. Read more in "Death Could Not Separate Them: How Elizabeth I Connected to Her Deceased Mother"…

It is often said that we do not know how Elizabeth I felt about her mother, Anne Boleyn, and it is widely written that she only spoken of her twice in her entire life...Using a surprising amount of contemporary evidence and a little bit of conjecture based on fact, we can, in fact determine how Elizabeth felt about Anne.-BB. Read more in "Death Could Not Separate Them: How Elizabeth I Connected to Her Deceased Mother"…

George Gower, portrait of Elizabeth I, c. 1588, variant of the Armada Portrait

George Gower, portrait of Elizabeth I, c. 1588, variant of the Armada Portrait

Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I (1533-1603)  by Nicholas Hilliard (ca. 1547-1619) she was one powerful woman.

Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I (1533-1603) by Nicholas Hilliard (ca. 1547-1619) she was one powerful woman.

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