Explore Clay Oven, Ovens and more!

Explore related topics

They are monogamous and the pair bond is long term, sometimes for life. The nest of the Rufous Hornero is typical for the genus : a large thick clay "oven" placed on a tree. Pairs remain together throughout the year and will work on the nest during that time . Nests can be constructed in as little as 5 days but usually take longer, occasionally months, to complete. Photo : João de barro

They are monogamous and the pair bond is long term, sometimes for life. The nest of the Rufous Hornero is typical for the genus : a large thick clay "oven" placed on a tree. Pairs remain together throughout the year and will work on the nest during that time . Nests can be constructed in as little as 5 days but usually take longer, occasionally months, to complete. Photo : João de barro

It is the female wasp alone to build those nest cells. The mother wasp brings a full mouthful of  mud each time to build the pot like nest cell bit by bit. Then hunt the spider and store inside, lay an egg and close the nest cell. A wasp takes about one to two days to complete a cell, which includes building the pot,  finding enough food, laying egg and sealing the pot. The mother wasp works in the day time and rest somewhere near by at night…

It is the female wasp alone to build those nest cells. The mother wasp brings a full mouthful of mud each time to build the pot like nest cell bit by bit. Then hunt the spider and store inside, lay an egg and close the nest cell. A wasp takes about one to two days to complete a cell, which includes building the pot, finding enough food, laying egg and sealing the pot. The mother wasp works in the day time and rest somewhere near by at night…

Burr Comb  Our bees were busy and built this burr comb inside a hive body section. Some even filled with honey !  https://www.flickr.com/photos/naturesdesign/4825623354/

Burr Comb Our bees were busy and built this burr comb inside a hive body section. Some even filled with honey ! https://www.flickr.com/photos/naturesdesign/4825623354/

Un arquitecto con alas que hace hornos de barro  El hornero (Furnarius) es un género de aves paseriformes de la familia Furnariidae.   Reciben su nombre por la forma de horno que tienen sus nidos construidos con barro.   Se pueden ver en Brasil, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia y Argentina, país donde es el ave nacional.  Otros nombres con los que se conoce a este pájaro son tiluchi, casero o alonsito.   En estas imágenes se puede ver a una pareja de horneros durante todo el proceso de…

Un arquitecto con alas que hace hornos de barro El hornero (Furnarius) es un género de aves paseriformes de la familia Furnariidae. Reciben su nombre por la forma de horno que tienen sus nidos construidos con barro. Se pueden ver en Brasil, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia y Argentina, país donde es el ave nacional. Otros nombres con los que se conoce a este pájaro son tiluchi, casero o alonsito. En estas imágenes se puede ver a una pareja de horneros durante todo el proceso de…

RUFOUS HORNERO is the national bird for ARGENTINA.   Rufous Hornero, Furnarius rufus is an ovenbird from South America. It is one of the most common birds seen in the parks and even on the pavements of the cities. With its exaggerated gait it is easily recognisable from a distance and its bright rufous tail makes it an easy bird to identify even if it is flying away from you. The trick is to know what it is before hand as the field guides do not give it star billing in their illustrations.

RUFOUS HORNERO is the national bird for ARGENTINA. Rufous Hornero, Furnarius rufus is an ovenbird from South America. It is one of the most common birds seen in the parks and even on the pavements of the cities. With its exaggerated gait it is easily recognisable from a distance and its bright rufous tail makes it an easy bird to identify even if it is flying away from you. The trick is to know what it is before hand as the field guides do not give it star billing in their illustrations.

Mamãe “João de Barro” cuidando de seus filhotinhos. | Lá na Roça

Mamãe “João de Barro” cuidando de seus filhotinhos. | Lá na Roça

Pinterest
Search