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The skull of an Australopithecus-Several million years ago, when a great many hominin species lived side-by-side, they mainly ate plants. "There is no evidence they were systematically preying on large animals,

The skull of an Australopithecus-Several million years ago, when a great many hominin species lived side-by-side, they mainly ate plants. "There is no evidence they were systematically preying on large animals,

From the Smithsonian: Sahelanthropus tchadensis is one of the oldest known species on the human family tree and lived between 7 and 6 million years ago in West-Central Africa (Chad). Walking upright may have helped this species survive in diverse habitats—including forests and grasslands.

From the Smithsonian: Sahelanthropus tchadensis is one of the oldest known species on the human family tree and lived between 7 and 6 million years ago in West-Central Africa (Chad). Walking upright may have helped this species survive in diverse habitats—including forests and grasslands.

Australopithecus garhi, first stone tool users (Act 5). "This appears to have many of the characteristics of the other Australopethcines but differs in that it has large molars, like the Paranthropus species. The partial skull fossil was found in association with stone tools. This may be the earliest species to use these."

Flores Man Split Off Before Homo Erectus

Australopithecus garhi, first stone tool users (Act 5). "This appears to have many of the characteristics of the other Australopethcines but differs in that it has large molars, like the Paranthropus species. The partial skull fossil was found in association with stone tools. This may be the earliest species to use these."

This is an Australopithecus Afarensis- "Australopithecus afarensis is an extinct hominid that lived between 3.9 and 2.9 million years ago. A. afarensis was slenderly built, like the younger Australopithecus africanus".

This is an Australopithecus Afarensis- "Australopithecus afarensis is an extinct hominid that lived between 3.9 and 2.9 million years ago. A. afarensis was slenderly built, like the younger Australopithecus africanus".

After 13 years of meticulous excavation of the nearly complete skeleton of the Australopithecus fossil named Little Foot, South African and French scientists have now convincingly shown that it is probably around 3 million years old

After 13 years of meticulous excavation of the nearly complete skeleton of the Australopithecus fossil named Little Foot, South African and French scientists have now convincingly shown that it is probably around 3 million years old

Australopithecus africanus - This species was the first of our pre-human ancestors to be discovered, but was initially rejected from our family tree because of its small brain. This opinion changed when new evidence showed this species had many features intermediate between apes and humans. - Learn more at: http://australianmuseum.net.au/Australopithecus-africanus#sthash.OHfeSzhB.dpuf

Australopithecus africanus - This species was the first of our pre-human ancestors to be discovered, but was initially rejected from our family tree because of its small brain. This opinion changed when new evidence showed this species had many features intermediate between apes and humans. - Learn more at: http://australianmuseum.net.au/Australopithecus-africanus#sthash.OHfeSzhB.dpuf

Paranthropus boisei Paranthropus boisei or Australopithecus boisei was an early hominin, described as the largest of the Paranthropus genus (robust australopithecines). It lived in Eastern Africa during the Pleistocene epoch from about 2.3 until about 1.2 million years ago.

Paranthropus boisei Paranthropus boisei or Australopithecus boisei was an early hominin, described as the largest of the Paranthropus genus (robust australopithecines). It lived in Eastern Africa during the Pleistocene epoch from about 2.3 until about 1.2 million years ago.

Australopithecus garhi skull and head, illustration. The remains of this early hominid were discovered in 1996 near the village of Bouri in the Middle Awash valley in Ethiopia, Africa. A. garhi lived in the pilocene era, between 2 and 3 million years ago.

Australopithecus garhi skull and head, illustration. The remains of this early hominid were discovered in 1996 near the village of Bouri in the Middle Awash valley in Ethiopia, Africa. A. garhi lived in the pilocene era, between 2 and 3 million years ago.

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