Family photos of the 1700s | IndiVisible - African-Native American Lives in the Americas

Family photos of the 1700s | IndiVisible - African-Native American Lives in the Americas

Black Cherokee Freedmen protested their expulsion from Cherokee Nation on Sept. 2, 2011 in Muskogee, Oklahoma. In 1860, the Cherokee Nation owned over 4,600 slaves. In February of 1863 the Cherokee Nation declared that all slaves within its limits were “forever free.” In 1983, the Cherokee Nation removed descendants of those slaves, known as the Cherokee Freedmen, from tribal membership rolls and prohibited from voting in Cherokee elections. Fed. judge Thomas F. Hogan to issue decision in…

Federal judge promises quick decision in Cherokee freedmen case

Black Cherokee Freedmen protested their expulsion from Cherokee Nation on Sept. 2, 2011 in Muskogee, Oklahoma. In 1860, the Cherokee Nation owned over 4,600 slaves. In February of 1863 the Cherokee Nation declared that all slaves within its limits were “forever free.” In 1983, the Cherokee Nation removed descendants of those slaves, known as the Cherokee Freedmen, from tribal membership rolls and prohibited from voting in Cherokee elections. Fed. judge Thomas F. Hogan to issue decision in…

Back row L-R: Tatatty (Comanche) with her niece, Wifeper or Frances Wright (Comanche/African American), and Tatatty's husband, Tatenequer (Comanche) Front row L-R: Henry Wright (Comanche/African American) son of Frances Wright, and his brother, Lorenzano Wright (Comanche/African American) - circa 1910

An Ancestry of African-Native Americans

Back row L-R: Tatatty (Comanche) with her niece, Wifeper or Frances Wright (Comanche/African American), and Tatatty's husband, Tatenequer (Comanche) Front row L-R: Henry Wright (Comanche/African American) son of Frances Wright, and his brother, Lorenzano Wright (Comanche/African American) - circa 1910

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