This large folding screen is made from old internal panels that would once have formed a dividing wall in a Chinese home. The panels have been refinished in a distressed red, black and cream lacquer and hinges added so that they can be used today as a standalone screen. A beautiful way to section off part of a large room, or use it as a backdrop against a wall.

This large folding screen is made from old internal panels that would once have formed a dividing wall in a Chinese home. The panels have been refinished in a distressed red, black and cream lacquer and hinges added so that they can be used today as a standalone screen. A beautiful way to section off part of a large room, or use it as a backdrop against a wall.

The panels in this screen were once used as dividers inside a home in Shanxi province but have been fitted together with brass hinges to form a simple screen. Made from elm wood, they have been refinished in a dark brown lacquer, showing the attractive wood grain. The lattice section in the upper part of each panel is bevelled, set within chunky rounded frames.

The panels in this screen were once used as dividers inside a home in Shanxi province but have been fitted together with brass hinges to form a simple screen. Made from elm wood, they have been refinished in a dark brown lacquer, showing the attractive wood grain. The lattice section in the upper part of each panel is bevelled, set within chunky rounded frames.

This simple, beautifully crafted lattice screen is made up of four hinged panels. Each one is created with mortise and tenon joints, with both sides being bevelled. The Chinese used decorative screens - either lacquered and painted or carved - from early on as a means of providing privacy. Whilst later ones tended to be very ornate and heavily carved, more understated designs like this were popular during the Ming dynasty.

This simple, beautifully crafted lattice screen is made up of four hinged panels. Each one is created with mortise and tenon joints, with both sides being bevelled. The Chinese used decorative screens - either lacquered and painted or carved - from early on as a means of providing privacy. Whilst later ones tended to be very ornate and heavily carved, more understated designs like this were popular during the Ming dynasty.

Shanxi, circa 1900 This square, carved window panel has a lovely criss-cross pattern, hand carved and set with a flower at the centre of each join. Once used as either an internal of external window panel in a Chinese home, today it would add a focal point hung on a wall. #ChineseWallArt

Shanxi, circa 1900 This square, carved window panel has a lovely criss-cross pattern, hand carved and set with a flower at the centre of each join. Once used as either an internal of external window panel in a Chinese home, today it would add a focal point hung on a wall. #ChineseWallArt

This screen is made up of two old panels which once would have formed part of an internal dividing wall in a Chinese home. Made from elm, the original dark finish has been stripped off to leave the natural pale colour of the wood beneath. The design is simple, with the crossed rectangles in the upper section designed to frame the view through the panels when originally in place.

This screen is made up of two old panels which once would have formed part of an internal dividing wall in a Chinese home. Made from elm, the original dark finish has been stripped off to leave the natural pale colour of the wood beneath. The design is simple, with the crossed rectangles in the upper section designed to frame the view through the panels when originally in place.

Chinese Rectangular Lattice Window Panel from the Shanxi Region

Chinese Rectangular Lattice Window Panel from the Shanxi Region

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