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Image result for Greek drachma

Ancient Greek coin. "Athenian Owl" with AOE. Denomination likely Tetradrachm, Circa 500 to 100 BC.

Athenian Owl with AOE. Denomination likely Tetradrachm, Circa 500 to 100 BC. to buy bitcoin

Silver Denarius, Shekel, half-shekel, bronze Prutah, and Lepton coins in common circulation during the time of Jesus Christ.

Silver Denarius, Shekel, half-shekel, bronze Prutah, and Lepton coins in common circulation during the time of Jesus Christ. Jesus betrayed for 30 pieces of silver.

Greece 1 Drachma Greek Coin 1973 UNC RRR Owl Phoenix Greek Military Junta | eBay

Greece 1 Drachma Greek Coin 1973 UNC RRR Owl Phoenix Greek Military Junta | eBay

Sterling Silver Cufflinks w/Ancient 2cnd Century BC Athens DRACHMA Greek Coins

Sterling Silver Cufflinks w/Ancient 2cnd Century BC Athens DRACHMA Greek Coins

Sterling Silver Cufflinks, Vintage Gifts, Athens, Cuffs, Arm Warmers

Gold Drachma Greek Coin  Item No. 4658 Vintage by urbanbeadbazaar, $3.95

Gold Drachma Greek Coin Item No.

1000 drachma - Greek Banknotes World War II Italian occupation of Ionian Islands Drachmas banknotes

1000 drachma - Greek Banknotes World War II Italian occupation of Ionian Islands Drachmas banknotes

drachma coin (tetradrachm) of Ptolemy I Soter (323–305 BC). This shows the head of Alexander the Great, with the ram’s horn of Zeus Ammon, clad in an elephant skin and aegis. This is one of the earliest coin portraits of Alexander.  Production place: struck at Memphis, Egypt Date: around  318 BC Silver - Hellenistic  #drachma #Macedonia #Hellenistic

Macedonian etradrachma showing the head of Alexander the Great, with the ram’s horn and clad in an elephant ,skin and aegis. This is one of the earliest coin portraits of Alexander around 318 BC Silver

Charon’s Obol, 4th-3rd Century BC A Charon’s Obol is the coin placed in or on the mouth of the deceased person before burial. An obol was originally a small silver coin, valued at one-sixth of a drachma. Greek and Latin literary sources explain it as...

Charon’s Obol, Century BC A Charon’s Obol is the coin placed in or on the mouth of the deceased person before burial. An obol was originally a small silver coin, valued at one-sixth of a drachma. Greek and Latin literary sources explain it as.

Greek Drachma, #Coin Cufflinks, #Greek Cufflinks, Ship Cufflinks, Greece, #Drachma Cufflinks, Greek Gift, Greek Coin, Cufflinks, Greek Wedding http://etsy.me/2CEkWVB #cufflinks #anniversary #unisexadults #coincufflinks #greekcufflinks

Greek Drachma, Coin Cufflinks, Greek Cufflinks, Ship Cufflinks, Greece, Drachma Cufflinks, Greek Gift, Greek Coin, Cufflinks, Greek Wedding

Greek Drachma, #Coin Cufflinks, #Greek Cufflinks, Ship Cufflinks, Greece, #Drachma Cufflinks, Greek Gift, Greek Coin, Cufflinks, Greek Wedding http://etsy.me/2CEkWVB #cufflinks #anniversary #unisexadults #coincufflinks #greekcufflinks

100 drachma - Greek Banknotes World War II Italian occupation of Ionian Islands Drachmas banknotes

100 drachma - Greek Banknotes World War II Italian occupation of Ionian Islands Drachmas banknotes

Greek, Thrace  Coin Showing Alexander the Great, 306/281 B.C. Issued by King Lysimachus of Thrace, 306–281 B.C.  Silver tetradrachm

Greek, Thrace Coin Showing Alexander the Great, B. Issued by King Lysimachus of Thrace, B. Silver tetradrachm World of the Greek Kingdom of in northern region of Greece Greek

500 drachma - Greek Banknotes World War II Italian occupation of Ionian Islands Drachmas banknotes

1000 drachma notes for the occupation of the Greek Ionian Islands. 100 drachma note with head of Aristotle.

4th C. BCE. The greek letters Ε ϕ (phi) with the Bee on this silver coin indicates the ancient greek city of Ephesus (Turkey) - the obverse would show its other emblem -the stag. The honey bee and the stag are symbols of the Goddess Artemis. Priestesses of Artemis in greek are "melissae" - which translates to "honey bee." Hence,  Ephesus was the City of Artemis. The temple of Artemis was originally built for the mother Goddess Cybele ca. 2000 BCE.

Many Ancient Coins had the emblem of the honey bee, a symbol of wealth and power due in part to the fact that ancient society realized that the honeybee had such control over their food supply. (But why does that bee look more like a wasp?

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