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Göbekli Tepe- Urfa, Turkey, 9600 BC (11.600 years ago)  The megaliths here predate Stonehenge by 6,000 years. Photo: Erdinç Bakla, 2012.

Göbeklitepe- Urfa, 9600 BC years ago) photography: Erdinç Bakla -- My note-- compare this anthropomorphic column to the Moai from Easter Island nearby on this board.

From Wikiwand: Bryn Celli Ddu, a late Neolithic chambered tomb on Anglesey

A low grassy mound with an entrance at its centre framed by cyclopean stones>> Bryn Celli Ddu, a late Neolithic chambered tomb on Angelsey.

Looking Down, What makes Stonehenge unique? For one, its design, which includes huge horizontal stone lintels capping the outer circle and sitting atop the vertical slabs called trilithons, locked together by joints. In addition, the structure includes two different kinds of stones called Bluestones and Sarsens, the largest of which weighs more than 40 tons, according to UNESCO.

In Photos: A Walk Through Stonehenge

Looking Down, What makes Stonehenge unique? For one, its design, which includes…

Resolving the Human Remains Crisis in British Archaeology: The Counter Argument In light of the protests at the opening of the new Stonehenge visitors centre, we look at the counter argument for displaying human remains as addressed by King Arthur Pendragon | Battlechieftain, Council of British Druid Order. Published on 15 December 2011

Astonishing new findings reveal Amesbury is now the longest continuous settlement in the UK. Previously it was thought that Stonehenge was conceived by European immigrants but this shows that British settlers were behind its construction.

Stonehedge https://www.flickr.com/photos/31403969@N04/15466638493/sizes/o/

Stonehedge https://www.flickr.com/photos/31403969@N04/15466638493/sizes/o/

La igualdad de género en la antigua sociedad neolítica de Stonehenge

Stonehenge Rock Source Identified The site however raises further questions about how the stones were transported from their source to what .

Archaeologists believe they have discovered a submerged Neolithic stone circle 500metres from the coast of Orkney whilst surveying near the Ring of Brodgar. (The third largest stone circle in the British Isles and dating from 3000-2000BC.)

Archaeologists believe they have discovered a submerged Neolithic stone circle from the coast of Orkney whilst surveying near the Ring of Brodgar. (The third largest stone circle in the British Isles and dating from

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