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Colonial Education | Agriculture and Education in Colonial America

Colonial Education | Agriculture and Education in Colonial America

In colonial times, candle making was an essential annual chore in all households. Taper candles were the only source of light for people's homes, and there were no commercial candles available as there are today. Each household made its own candles, usually once a year. The average household needed

There is nothing like the smell of hand-dipped beeswax candles; Make your own beautiful hand-dipped beeswax candles with this easy, step-by-step guide.

Life in the Colonial Period.  A well-written short summary of men's and women's roles in Colonial America.

What Was Life Like in the Colonial Time Period?

Life in the Colonial Period. A well-written short summary of men's and women's roles in Colonial America that shows that our century conceptions of century gender roles may not be all that accurate ;

Green yarn in basket held by Karen Clancey; weaver and dyer for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Photo by Barbara Temple Lombardi

Green yarn in basket held by Karen Clancey; weaver and dyer for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Photo by Barbara Temple Lombardi

Master Bookbinder Bruce Plumley                                                                                                                                                      at his Williamsburg shop

Master Bookbinder Bruce Plumley at Williamsburg, VA: The early craft of bookbinding

Artist unidentified; center block printed by John Hewson (1744–1821)  United States, 1790–1810  Cotton and possibly linen, 85 1/2 x 76 in.American Folk Art Museum. Hewson is best known for block-printed squares featuring an elaborate vase overflowing with flowers and sheaves of wheat and surrounded by motifs of butterflies and birds.

Hewson-Center Quilt with Multiple Borders Artist unidentified; center block printed by John Hewson Photographed by Gavin Ashworth

Wheelwrights do their part for the wagons, carriages, and riding chairs of Colonial Williamsburg.

The Wheelwright: made of wood and bound with iron, the wheels of the carriages, wagons, and riding chairs that navigated rugged colonial roads had to be strong and tight. But first and foremost, the wheels had to be round.

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