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This magnificent home was demolished in 1927 and today the site is occupied by the Bergdorf Goodman department store. The only remnant of the mansion are its magnificent gates, which today provide the entrance to Central Park's Conservatory Gardens at 104th and Fifth.

Looking back at Manhattan's lost Gilded Age mansions

Cornelius Vanderbilt II mansion (demolished) formerly at 1 West St, New York City. Architects George B Post and Richard Morris Hunt. Built 1882 with substantial 1894 addition. Demolished Vintage b&w photo.

Looking Back at Manhattan's Lost Gilded Age Mansions                                                                                                                                                                                 More

Looking back at Manhattan's lost Gilded Age mansions

- Charles M. Schwab mansion, West End Ave & Riverside Drive, 73 to 74 Sts, NYC, demolished 1948

The Bostwick Mansion, extended to 801 and 802 Fifth Avenue. Image via Daytonian in Manhattan.

A Guide to the Gilded Age Mansions of 5th Avenue's Millionaire Row – Part II

Mansions of the Gilded Age: The Duke Semans Mansion on Fifth Avenue and 82nd Street

The Duke-Seamans Mansion. It is still privately owned, but by a new owner.

Here is a guide to the Gilded Age mansions on 5th Avenue, both those still standing and those lost.

A Guide to the Gilded Age Mansions of 5th Avenue's Millionaire Row

Cornelius-Vanderbilt-II-House-Fifth-Avenue-NYC (The Cornelius Vanderbilt II Mansion on Street and Avenue, now demolished)

With interest growing in the designs of the Aesthetic Movement, a new permanent installation and an accompanying exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art recalls lost passions and the émigré cabinetmaker who gave them form.

The Sumptuous Creations of New York's Gilded Age

With interest growing in the designs of the Aesthetic Movement, a new permanent installation and an accompanying exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art recalls lost passions and the émigré cabinetmaker who gave them form.

I adore creepy homes. This is the Carleton Island Villa, built in 1894. Today, after more than 60 years of neglect, the house stands nearly gutted by the elements, in need of a complete restoration. According to an architect who recently surveyed the site, the stone structure itself requires little work, but restoring the interiors to their Gilded Age glories would require a sizable fortune.

The Spookiest, Creepiest Old Houses For Sale in America

The Carleton Villa on Carleton Island in the Thousand Islands archipelago of New York. Built in 1894 for William O. Wyckoff, whose massive fortune was derived from the Remington arms and typewriter company. The villa has been abandoned for over 60 years.

Home of Isaac Vail Brokaw on 79th and 5th. Finished 1890. Demolished 1965.

Looking back at Manhattan's lost Gilded Age mansions

The Isaac Vail Brokaw mansion, built in 1890 on the corner of East Street & Fifth Avenue. Torn down in 1965 for an apartment house. So many wonderful buildings were torn down to accommodate banality! In the name of the almighty dollar.

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