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Figure of a Seated Chieftain Early Classic Remojadas Southern Veracruz, Gulf Coast Mexico 300-600 CE Terracotta

Figure of a Seated Chieftain Early Classic Remojadas Southern Veracruz, Gulf Coast Mexico CE Terracotta

Figure of a Standing Warrior, ceramic with pigment, 650/800 CE, Late Classic Maya, Jaina; Campeche or Yucatán, Mexico

Figure of a Standing Warrior, ceramic with pigment, 650/800 CE, Late Classic Maya, Jaina; Campeche or Yucatán, Mexico

Closeup of a Figure of a Seated Chieftain Early Classic Remojadas Southern Veracruz, Gulf Coast Mexico 300-600 CE Terracotta

Closeup of a Figure of a Seated Chieftain Early Classic Remojadas Southern Veracruz, Gulf Coast Mexico CE Terracotta

Zapotec Sculpture of a Ferocious Feline - PF.0887  Origin: Veracruz, Mexico  Circa: 300 AD to 600 AD  Dimensions: 20" (50.8cm) high  Catalogue: V4  Collection: Pre-Columbian  Medium: Terracotta

Zapotec Sculpture of a Ferocious Feline - Origin: Veracruz, Mexico Circa: 300 AD to 600 AD Dimensions: high Catalogue: Collection: Pre-Columbian Medium: Terracotta

MAYA

Warrior vessel West Mexico Oaxaca Mixtec culture 300 CE Clay by…

Standing female dignitary in form of a whistle Mexico Jaina Late Classic Period 600-900 CE Earthenware (2)

Mayan standing female dignitary in form of a whistle Mexico Jaina Late Classic Period AD.

Smiling figure holding a rattle Mexico Remojadas culture Veracruz Late Classic Period 6th-8th century CE Earthenware by mharrsch, via Flickr

Smiling figure holding a rattle Mexico Remojadas culture Veracruz Late Classic Period century CE Earthenware

Funerary figurines from a tomb of an unnamed Mayan king, probably depicting the successor king and his queen (seventh century AD).

Vibrant figurines found in a tomb at the city of Waká reveal the ancient Maya ceremonies of burial and resurrection. A figure probably representing the successor king, left, and his queen, right, seemed to preside over the funeral.

7-10th C. Nopiloa culture, Veracruz mold-made ceramic whistle of a mustachioed and bearded male ball player. The Nopiloa interacted with other Mesoamerican cultures, and this Nopiloa figure displays motifs commonly found in Mayan art. Knotted ties, like those around this player's wrist and neck, in Maya pictorial language connote captured prisoners. A motif similar to the Maya mat, a symbol of rulership is the flanged headdress. A protective yoke on his waist. Very perplexing mixed motifs.

Ball Player Date: century Geography: Mexico, Mesoamerica, Veracruz Culture: Nopiloa Medium: Ceramic The Met

Closeup of a Figurine of an aristocratic lady Late Classic Maya Jaina style Campeche or Yucatan         Mexico 650-800 CE Ceramic and     pigment    Art Institute of Chicago

Maya - Figurine of an aristocratic lady Late Classic Maya Jaina style Campeche or Yucatan - Mexico CE Ceramic and pigment - Art Institute of Chicago

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