Explore Festival Coats, Chinese Embroidery and more!

Detail of Festival Robe, Qing dynasty (1644–1911), 19th-century; The Metropolitan Museum of Art @metmuseum

Detail of Festival Robe, century Qing dynasty, Daoguang period China Silk, metallic thread The Metropolitan Museum of Art,

Festival Robe | Period: Qing dynasty (1644–1911) | Date: second half of the 18th century |  Medium: Silk and metallic thread embroidery on silk satin.

Dragon Robe, Period: Qing dynasty Date: century Culture: China, Medium: Silk gauze embroidered with silk and metallic thread

Daoist Priests Robe detail. Qing Dynasty. (1644-1911) 17th-18th Century. China. Satin, metallic thread.

Daoist Priests Robe detail. Qing Dynasty. (1644-1911) 17th-18th Century. China. Satin, metallic thread.

chinese Opera Robe 5 toed Dragon Vintage outerwear by Luxorama, $400.00

Chinese Opera Robe 5 toed Dragon Vintage outerwear silk white blue 50 years old

Textile with Phoenixes and Dragons, 13th century, Yuan dynasty (1271–1368). China. Silk and metallic thread lampas weave.  This textile is one of very few northern Chinese silk-and-gold textiles to have survived from the Yuan dynasty. The dragons chasing pearls, the phoenixes, and the background of tiny hexagons are Chinese motifs, but the lobed roundels enclosing the dragons and phoenixes indicate the influence of eastern Iranian artisans who had been relocated to northern China.

The dragons chasing pearls, the phoenixes, and the background of tiny hexagons are Chinese motifs, but the lobed roundels enclosing the dragons and phoenixes indicate the influence of eastern Iranian artisans who had been relocated to northern China.

Dragon wall, Forbidden City, China Dragon wall, Forbidden City, China  Copyright for this gallery photo belongs solely to Jim Zuckerman ©

Dragon wall, Forbidden City, China Dragon wall, Forbidden City, China Copyright for this gallery photo belongs solely to Jim Zuckerman ©

Tapestry-woven (kesi) silk and metallic thread woman's sleeveless jacket, late 19th–early 20th century China  #art #textile #butterflies

m-memeng: “ Woman’s sleeveless jacket with butterflies (detail), late century China Tapestry-woven (kesi) silk and metallic thread ”

Corridor in the Imperial Palace of the Forbidden City by Edwin Leung (China)

Corridor in the Imperial Palace of the Forbidden City by Edwin Leung (China) Red is the most common color of Chinese ancient architecture because Chinese believe it means luck.

Pinterest
Search