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A satellite view of Mount Shasta's west flank, with the area most affected by pyroclastic avalanches and flows from Shastina and Black Butte.

A satellite view of Mount Shasta's west flank, with the area most affected by pyroclastic avalanches and flows from Shastina and Black Butte.

Hummocky terrain of the debris avalanche north of Mount Shasta.

Hummocky terrain of the debris avalanche north of Mount Shasta.

An aerial view shows the terminous of the Lava Park lava flow, erupted from a vent on the flank of Shastina lava dome on the NW flank of Mount Shasta about 9300 years ago. The blocky basaltic-andesite flow is about 6 km long and 110 m thick at its snout. The lava flow overlies a wide apron of pyroclastic-flow deposits erupted from Mount Shasta about 9700 years ago. The area shown is about 2000 m wide. The broad line crossing the photo near the bottom is Highway 97.

An aerial view shows the terminous of the Lava Park lava flow, erupted from a vent on the flank of Shastina lava dome on the NW flank of Mount Shasta about 9300 years ago. The blocky basaltic-andesite flow is about 6 km long and 110 m thick at its snout. The lava flow overlies a wide apron of pyroclastic-flow deposits erupted from Mount Shasta about 9700 years ago. The area shown is about 2000 m wide. The broad line crossing the photo near the bottom is Highway 97.

Mount Adams viewed from the Klickitat Valley. Mount Adams is the largest active volcano in Washington State and among the largest in the Cascades. The volcano has produced a larger volume (about 300 km3 or 70 mi3) of eruptive material during the past million years than any other Cascade stratovolcano except Mount Shasta (about 350 km3 or 85 mi3)

Mount Adams viewed from the Klickitat Valley. Mount Adams is the largest active volcano in Washington State and among the largest in the Cascades. The volcano has produced a larger volume (about 300 km3 or 70 mi3) of eruptive material during the past million years than any other Cascade stratovolcano except Mount Shasta (about 350 km3 or 85 mi3)

The forested hills and rolling pasture lands near the town of Montague are part of a massive debris-avalanche deposit that originated from Mount Shasta during the Pleistocene. The hills consist of remnants of the former edifice of Mount Shasta that were transported relatively intact to this point, about 40 km NW of the volcano, in the largest known Quaternary avalanche from a continental volcano.

The forested hills and rolling pasture lands near the town of Montague are part of a massive debris-avalanche deposit that originated from Mount Shasta during the Pleistocene. The hills consist of remnants of the former edifice of Mount Shasta that were transported relatively intact to this point, about 40 km NW of the volcano, in the largest known Quaternary avalanche from a continental volcano.

Mount Shasta - Karuk: Úytaahkoo or "White Mountain")is a potentially active volcano located at the southern end of the Cascade Range in Siskiyou County, California. At 14,179 feet (4,322 m), it is the second highest peak in the Cascades and the fifth highest in California. Mount Shasta has an estimated volume of 85 cubic miles (350 km3) which makes it the most voluminous stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc.]

Mount Shasta - Karuk: Úytaahkoo or "White Mountain")is a potentially active volcano located at the southern end of the Cascade Range in Siskiyou County, California. At 14,179 feet (4,322 m), it is the second highest peak in the Cascades and the fifth highest in California. Mount Shasta has an estimated volume of 85 cubic miles (350 km3) which makes it the most voluminous stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc.]

California's Snow covered Mount Shasta (summit on left) as seen from the town of Weed. Photograph taken 5 January, 2017 by Pam Eves from the top of a hummock left during the massive debris avalanche and eruption that occurred approximately 300,000 to 380,000 years ago

California's Snow covered Mount Shasta (summit on left) as seen from the town of Weed. Photograph taken 5 January, 2017 by Pam Eves from the top of a hummock left during the massive debris avalanche and eruption that occurred approximately 300,000 to 380,000 years ago

Steep-sided Black Buttes lava dome on the lower SW flank of Mount Shasta, was formed during the early Holocene at the same time as the formation of Shastina lava dome on the upper west flank. Pyroclastic flows accompanying growth the Black Buttes traveled up to 11 km to the south.

Steep-sided Black Buttes lava dome on the lower SW flank of Mount Shasta, was formed during the early Holocene at the same time as the formation of Shastina lava dome on the upper west flank. Pyroclastic flows accompanying growth the Black Buttes traveled up to 11 km to the south.

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