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BUMMER, they're cute and they're killing them ... CFZ: Daily News: Badger cull in Wales quashed in the Court of Appeal

BUMMER, they're cute and they're killing them ... CFZ: Daily News: Badger cull in Wales quashed in the Court of Appeal

Lest you feel too sorry for those lambs...just wait until they are a few weeks old! Lambs can be VERY persistent, and quite sneaky if needed, in stealing milk. Lambs that aren't getting enough milk from their own mother will become quite adept at it. One tactic they use is to wait until the ewe's own lamb is nursing. She will check by smelling it to make sure it is her own. Then the Then the "imposter lamb" will approach from behind her and nudge the other lamb off the teat and drink.

Lest you feel too sorry for those lambs...just wait until they are a few weeks old! Lambs can be VERY persistent, and quite sneaky if needed, in stealing milk. Lambs that aren't getting enough milk from their own mother will become quite adept at it. One tactic they use is to wait until the ewe's own lamb is nursing. She will check by smelling it to make sure it is her own. Then the Then the "imposter lamb" will approach from behind her and nudge the other lamb off the teat and drink.

Zoos are trying very had to breed loris babies to help with captive populations, as loris numbers in the wild dwindle. Adopt a weird and wonderful loris from a place like Bristol Zoo that has an adoption scheme!  They are super social, very intelligent, and have strong bonds; and the babies you see in those videos it is sad to say have the slimmest chance to make it of them all. Help us keep loris babies in the forest where they belong!

Zoos are trying very had to breed loris babies to help with captive populations, as loris numbers in the wild dwindle. Adopt a weird and wonderful loris from a place like Bristol Zoo that has an adoption scheme! They are super social, very intelligent, and have strong bonds; and the babies you see in those videos it is sad to say have the slimmest chance to make it of them all. Help us keep loris babies in the forest where they belong!

They have about 190 days gestation (more than 6 months!), and give birth to 16-60 g babies (consider the adults are 400-2000 g!). They do not wean their babies until about 6 months. The young loris grows at this point and becomes quite big, and the mum has to keep pushing the needy baby away! Lorises can be anywhere there are trees, really…so if you see a baby, leave it be. Its mum is just munching and she will be back for her treasure!

They have about 190 days gestation (more than 6 months!), and give birth to 16-60 g babies (consider the adults are 400-2000 g!). They do not wean their babies until about 6 months. The young loris grows at this point and becomes quite big, and the mum has to keep pushing the needy baby away! Lorises can be anywhere there are trees, really…so if you see a baby, leave it be. Its mum is just munching and she will be back for her treasure!

Tibetan Mastiff This fluffy dog may look like a cuddler, but the breed is actually used regularly for protection. They are are incredibly smart and loyal to their owners and will do anything to keep them safe.

Tibetan Mastiff This fluffy dog may look like a cuddler, but the breed is actually used regularly for protection. They are are incredibly smart and loyal to their owners and will do anything to keep them safe.

The greater galagos or thick-tailed bushbabies are the common name for three species of strepsirrhine primates. They are classified in the genus Otolemur in the family Galagidae.

The greater galagos or thick-tailed bushbabies are the common name for three species of strepsirrhine primates. They are classified in the genus Otolemur in the family Galagidae.

A cute Gentoo penguin baby. Penguins have three hundred times more feathers than flying birds of the same size, with a layer of down that traps air for insulation and an outer layer of feathers that can lock together to form a water-tight covering. Their feathers also help control the penguin’s body temperature. They spend up to three hours a day preening to ensure that the feathers are clean.

A cute Gentoo penguin baby. Penguins have three hundred times more feathers than flying birds of the same size, with a layer of down that traps air for insulation and an outer layer of feathers that can lock together to form a water-tight covering. Their feathers also help control the penguin’s body temperature. They spend up to three hours a day preening to ensure that the feathers are clean.