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Harv Greenberg Photography - A Wedding Banquet for Tsars - Catherine the Great's Summer Palace - Russia.

Harv Greenberg Photography - A Wedding Banquet for Tsars - Catherine the Great's Summer Palace - Russia.

Waiters' Room at the Catherine Palace - Charles Cameron split the Waiters’ Room, one of the service rooms in the eighteenth-century Great Palace (the Catherine Palace) at the time of Paul I, in two with a crosswise partition, making two anterooms, one of which was in semidarkness and led to the stairs

Waiters' Room at the Catherine Palace - Charles Cameron split the Waiters’ Room, one of the service rooms in the eighteenth-century Great Palace (the Catherine Palace) at the time of Paul I, in two with a crosswise partition, making two anterooms, one of which was in semidarkness and led to the stairs

One of the public rooms inside the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoe Selo (Tsar's Village) Russia

One of the public rooms inside the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoe Selo (Tsar's Village) Russia

Elizaveta Romanovna Vorontsova, lived 1739–1792, a mistress of Emperor Peter III of Russia. During their affair, Peter was rumored to have intentions of divorcing his wife Catherine (the future empress) to marry Vorontsova. After Elizaveta's lover became Emperor in January 1762, he invested her with the Order of Saint Catherine and had rooms prepared for her in the newly built Winter Palace next to his own.

Elizaveta Romanovna Vorontsova, lived 1739–1792, a mistress of Emperor Peter III of Russia. During their affair, Peter was rumored to have intentions of divorcing his wife Catherine (the future empress) to marry Vorontsova. After Elizaveta's lover became Emperor in January 1762, he invested her with the Order of Saint Catherine and had rooms prepared for her in the newly built Winter Palace next to his own.

Catherine Palace   The palace was the summer residence of the Russian tsars, located in the town of Pushkin, 25 km south-east of St. Petersburg, Russia.   The residence originated in 1717, when Catherine I of Russia constructed a summer palace for her pleasure.

Catherine Palace The palace was the summer residence of the Russian tsars, located in the town of Pushkin, 25 km south-east of St. Petersburg, Russia. The residence originated in 1717, when Catherine I of Russia constructed a summer palace for her pleasure.

Peter and Paul Fortress, which holds the remains of the Romanov family, Catherine the Great and other Czars. St. Petersburg, Russia

Peter and Paul Fortress, which holds the remains of the Romanov family, Catherine the Great and other Czars. St. Petersburg, Russia

Alexei Grigoryevich Orlov, lived 1737–1808, brother of Gregory, was by far the ablest member of the Orlov count family, and was also remarkable for his athletic strength and dexterity. In the palace revolution of 1762 he played an even more important part than his brother Gregory. It was he who conveyed Peter III to the chateau of Ropsha and murdered him there with his own hands.

Alexei Grigoryevich Orlov, lived 1737–1808, brother of Gregory, was by far the ablest member of the Orlov count family, and was also remarkable for his athletic strength and dexterity. In the palace revolution of 1762 he played an even more important part than his brother Gregory. It was he who conveyed Peter III to the chateau of Ropsha and murdered him there with his own hands.

Praskovya Ivanovna, lived 1694–1731, Russian tsarevna, daughter of Ivan V  and Praskovia Saltykova. Niece of Peter I, the Great, sister of Empress Anna Ivanovna.  Her father died in 1696 and she was raised with her sisters Catherine Ivanovna and Anna at the estate awarded to her mother by Tsar Peter, Izmailovo. Married to a Rurikid noble, Ivan Dmitriev-Mamonov. Died childless.

Praskovya Ivanovna, lived 1694–1731, Russian tsarevna, daughter of Ivan V and Praskovia Saltykova. Niece of Peter I, the Great, sister of Empress Anna Ivanovna. Her father died in 1696 and she was raised with her sisters Catherine Ivanovna and Anna at the estate awarded to her mother by Tsar Peter, Izmailovo. Married to a Rurikid noble, Ivan Dmitriev-Mamonov. Died childless.

Portrait by artist Heyde after Richard Brompton in 1790 of young Tsar Alexander I Pavlovich Romanov (1777-1825) Russia & his brother Constantine Pavlovich (1779-1831). Grandmother Catherine II the Great (1729-1796) chose Andrey Samborsky for their religious instruction. He was an Orthodox Priest who had lived in England & taught them to speak English, uncommon for Russian autocrats at the time. Location in 2015 in The Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia, Inventory No. ET- 4491.

Portrait by artist Heyde after Richard Brompton in 1790 of young Tsar Alexander I Pavlovich Romanov (1777-1825) Russia & his brother Constantine Pavlovich (1779-1831). Grandmother Catherine II the Great (1729-1796) chose Andrey Samborsky for their religious instruction. He was an Orthodox Priest who had lived in England & taught them to speak English, uncommon for Russian autocrats at the time. Location in 2015 in The Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia, Inventory No. ET- 4491.

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