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[The first scene from William Hogarth's 'Marriage a la Mode', 1740s.] The author Mark Girouard makes an excellent point in how this series reflects changing social tides of the mid 18th century. A old earl reviews the marriage contract of his son, surrounded in a room bedecked with his coronet. The whole air of the piece, in the general fashion of Hogarth, pokes fun at the personalities of the subjects. Even the title reflects a marriage for love over an arranged union.~

[The first scene from William Hogarth's 'Marriage a la Mode', 1740s.] The author Mark Girouard makes an excellent point in how this series reflects changing social tides of the mid 18th century. A old earl reviews the marriage contract of his son, surrounded in a room bedecked with his coronet. The whole air of the piece, in the general fashion of Hogarth, pokes fun at the personalities of the subjects. Even the title reflects a marriage for love over an arranged union.~

This painting illustrates a dramatic scene from Giovanni Boccaccio’s celebrated medieval novel, the Decameron. The heroine Sigismunda holds a golden goblet sent to her by her father, Prince Tancred. Inside, is the heart of her dead husband, Giuscardo – one of Tancred’s servants. He has murdered him, enraged by their unsuitable secret marriage.

This painting illustrates a dramatic scene from Giovanni Boccaccio’s celebrated medieval novel, the Decameron. The heroine Sigismunda holds a golden goblet sent to her by her father, Prince Tancred. Inside, is the heart of her dead husband, Giuscardo – one of Tancred’s servants. He has murdered him, enraged by their unsuitable secret marriage.

William Hogarth ‘O the Roast Beef of Old England (‘The Gate of Calais’)’, 1748

William Hogarth ‘O the Roast Beef of Old England (‘The Gate of Calais’)’, 1748

William Hogarth, A rake's progress (1733) "The eight paintings in William Hogarth's A Rake's Progress (1733) tell the story of Tom Rakewell, a young man who follows a path of vice and self-destruction after inheriting a fortune from his miserly father."

William Hogarth, A rake's progress (1733) "The eight paintings in William Hogarth's A Rake's Progress (1733) tell the story of Tom Rakewell, a young man who follows a path of vice and self-destruction after inheriting a fortune from his miserly father."

Check out the cheeky bewigged dog | Captain Lord George Graham (1715–1747), in His Cabin | William Hogarth  Date painted: c.1745  Collection: National Maritime Museum  "Cabin scenes are rare in oil painting and this is the most famous example in British art. This conversation piece was probably commissioned by the sitter, the youngest son of the first Duke of Montrose, to celebrate his action off Ostend in June 1745"

Check out the cheeky bewigged dog | Captain Lord George Graham (1715–1747), in His Cabin | William Hogarth Date painted: c.1745 Collection: National Maritime Museum "Cabin scenes are rare in oil painting and this is the most famous example in British art. This conversation piece was probably commissioned by the sitter, the youngest son of the first Duke of Montrose, to celebrate his action off Ostend in June 1745"

The Beggar's Opera, Scene 5, by William Hogarth, ca. 1728.

The Beggar's Opera, Scene 5, by William Hogarth, ca. 1728.

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