Dr. Jean L. Fourcroy postponed studying medicine to support her husband's career and raise a family. She was 42 years old and the mother of four teenagers when she began training as a physician in 1972, and has gone on to become a leading advocate for women in medicine and a nationally-recognized scientist and surgeon.

Dr. Jean L. Fourcroy postponed studying medicine to support her husband's career and raise a family. She was 42 years old and the mother of four teenagers when she began training as a physician in 1972, and has gone on to become a leading advocate for women in medicine and a nationally-recognized scientist and surgeon.

Regina Benjamin practices as a country doctor in rural Alabama. As founder and CEO of the Bayou La Batre Rural Health Clinic, Dr. Regina Benjamin is making a difference to the underserved poor in a small fishing village on the Gulf Coast of Alabama. It is a town of about 2500 people, about 80 percent of her patients live below the poverty level, and Dr. Benjamin is their only physician.

Regina Benjamin practices as a country doctor in rural Alabama. As founder and CEO of the Bayou La Batre Rural Health Clinic, Dr. Regina Benjamin is making a difference to the underserved poor in a small fishing village on the Gulf Coast of Alabama. It is a town of about 2500 people, about 80 percent of her patients live below the poverty level, and Dr. Benjamin is their only physician.

Audrey Forbes Manley (born March 25, 1934) was appointed acting Surgeon General of the U.S. 1995-1997. From 1997 to 2002 she served as President of Spelman College. She was the first alumna to be elected president of the college, carrying on the legacy of her husband Dr. Albert E. Manley, who was the first African-American and male president of Spelman College from 1953 to 1976. She received a B.A. from Spelman College in 1955 and graduated from Meharry Medical College.

Audrey Forbes Manley (born March 25, 1934) was appointed acting Surgeon General of the U.S. 1995-1997. From 1997 to 2002 she served as President of Spelman College. She was the first alumna to be elected president of the college, carrying on the legacy of her husband Dr. Albert E. Manley, who was the first African-American and male president of Spelman College from 1953 to 1976. She received a B.A. from Spelman College in 1955 and graduated from Meharry Medical College.

Dr. Anna Lenore Skow Southam conducted extensive research and published widely in the area of reproductive health, infertility, and sterility, and performed some of the earliest clinical evaluations of a rapid immunological pregnancy test.

Dr. Anna Lenore Skow Southam conducted extensive research and published widely in the area of reproductive health, infertility, and sterility, and performed some of the earliest clinical evaluations of a rapid immunological pregnancy test.

Susan Emma Hertz Howard, M.D., broke off her engagement to have her own career. After graduating at the turn of the century, she became the first woman physician in Burlington, Vermont.

Susan Emma Hertz Howard, M.D., broke off her engagement to have her own career. After graduating at the turn of the century, she became the first woman physician in Burlington, Vermont.

Mary Amanda Dixon Jones, 1828-1908.By removing the uterus and a seventeen-pound tumor from a patient in 1888, Dixon Jones became the first credited doctor to successfully perform a hysterectomy.

Mary Amanda Dixon Jones, 1828-1908.By removing the uterus and a seventeen-pound tumor from a patient in 1888, Dixon Jones became the first credited doctor to successfully perform a hysterectomy.

June E. Osborn: At the Center of National Policy on AIDS - Explore a new finding aid for this manuscript collection

June E. Osborn: At the Center of National Policy on AIDS - Explore a new finding aid for this manuscript collection

Yvette Roubideaux, M.D., a member of the Rosebud Sioux tribe, is an assistant professor in both the College of Public Health and College of Medicine at the University of Arizona in Tucson. She has dedicated her career to improving American Indian health care through teaching and research, focusing on diabetes as a pervasive chronic disease.

Yvette Roubideaux, M.D., a member of the Rosebud Sioux tribe, is an assistant professor in both the College of Public Health and College of Medicine at the University of Arizona in Tucson. She has dedicated her career to improving American Indian health care through teaching and research, focusing on diabetes as a pervasive chronic disease.

In 1966, Frances Krauskopf Conley became the first woman to pursue a surgical internship at Stanford University Hospital, and in 1986 she became the first woman to be appointed to a tenured full professorship of neurosurgery at a medical school in the United States.

In 1966, Frances Krauskopf Conley became the first woman to pursue a surgical internship at Stanford University Hospital, and in 1986 she became the first woman to be appointed to a tenured full professorship of neurosurgery at a medical school in the United States.

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