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The women of the samurai had as main role to look after the house. This was especially crucial in the ' feudal times , when the husbands were often away fighting in other States or engaged in clan battles. His wife, or okugatasama (literally: the one who stays at home), as well as look after the children and chores, he was often having to physically defend the house from thieves and invaders. For this reason, many women of the samurai class were trained skillful use of a weapon in the…

In feudal times, the samurai's wife, or okugatasama (literally: the one who stays at home), looked after the children and chores, and defend the house from thieves and invaders while her husband was away in State or clan battles.

Life and death in the name of honor: the samurai  The Japanese Samurai were undoubtedly one of the greatest fighters in modern history. Their caste, that of warriors, was one of two classes of ' Japanese aristocracy . Their name is considered as deriving from the verb " saburau " which literally means "one who serves " . Another term by which the samurai were defined was bushi, from " bu "which means martial and" shi ", the union of the lower horizontal section showing the number 1 and the…

The Japanese Samurai were undoubtedly one of the greatest fighters in modern history. Their caste, that of warriors, was one of two classes of Japanese aristocracy.

The "Ironing Board" without the Iron. Actually, it's better described as a "drying board", I suppose. The wet kimono was "stuck" to the board, and the water smoothed down by hand from top to bottom. The shape was carefully preserved, preventing any odd "stretching" in any one direction, and it was dried in place -- or at least until dry enough to be removed and carefully hung in another place that would hasten drying on both sides, and prevent str...

mortisia: “ KIMONO DAYS — Japanese Women and Their Everyday Tools. The “Ironing Board” without the Iron. Actually, it’s better described as a “drying board”, I suppose. The wet kimono was “stuck” to.

Sakamoto Ryōma (January 3, 1836 – December 10, 1867) was a leader of the movement to overthrow the Tokugawa shogunate during the Bakumatsu period in Japan.

坂本龍馬 Sakamoto Ryōma (January 1836 – December was a leader of the movement to overthrow the Tokugawa shogunate during the Bakumatsu period in Japan.

A yakunin, Japan.  Photographs of Japanese officials in Nagasaki 1868.

A yakunin, Japan. Photographs of Japanese officials in Nagasaki Donated by Marine lieutenant G.

Canal Street from St. Charles Street to the Mississippi river in New Orleans Louisiana in the 1860s :: State Library of Louisiana Historic Photograph Collection

Canal Street from St. Charles Street to the Mississippi river in New Orleans Louisiana in the :: State Library of Louisiana Historic Photograph Collection

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