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In order to be rated as good as a good man in the field of her earnings, she must show herself better than he. She must be more steady, or more trustworthy, or more skilled, or more cheap in order to have the same chance of employment.  Florence Kelly image from en.wikipedia.org

Florence Kelley Kelley did more than any other century American to rectify the awful conditions of child labor. She was also a leading organizer against sweatshops and a pioneering advocate for working women.

Genetics// Ralph C. Lincoln, 11th generation Lincoln, 3rd cousin of Abraham

Meet an Generation Lincoln. The image above pairs the President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, with Ralph Lincoln, an generation Lincoln and third cousin of the late president.

Rose Schneiderman was a labor activist, union leader and champion of women's rights. Learn more about her life of activism on Biography.com.

Rose Schneiderman - labor union leader, suffragist and member of the National American Woman Suffrage Association.

Nancy Wake, WWII spy.  "I hate wars and violence but if they come then I don't see why we women should just wave our men a proud goodbye and then knit them balaclavas."

Nancy Wake, ‘White Mouse’ of World War II. The Gestapo called her “The White Mouse” for the way she deftly avoided their traps. Nancy Wake, was one of the most effective and cunning British agents working in German-occupied France during World War II.

On July 11, 1970, Brigadier General Anna Mae Hays became the first woman in the U.S. military to be given a general officer rank.

Anna Mae Hays received a commission in the Army Nurse Corps in May…

Jeannette Rankin (1880-1973) | New Georgia Encyclopedia

Jeannette Rankin, the first woman elected to the U. House of Representatives and a longtime resident of Watkinsville, left an indelible mark on Montana, on Georgia, and on the nation through her

James K. Polk was born in North Carolina on November 2,1795. In 1825 he entered the House of Representatives, where he served for 14 years.    He was elected to the Presidency in 1844. During his term, major issues included the boundary with Canada in the far Northwest and the Mexican War.

James K. Polk was born in North Carolina on November 2,1795. In 1825 he entered the House of Representatives, where he served for 14 years. He was elected to the Presidency in 1844. During his term, major issues included the boundary with Canada in the far Northwest and the Mexican War.

Clarina Nichols. Reformer, journalist, made a name for herself writing about what would later become three life-defining passions: women's rights in child custody, married women's property rights, and equality in matters pertaining to public schools.

Clarina Nichols (journalist, reformer) made a name for herself writing about what would later become three life-defining passions: women's rights in child custody, married women's property rights, and equality in matters pertaining to public schools.

I didn’t know, did you know®…   Today in African American and women’s history, educator and social reformer Fannie Barrier Williams was born in 1855. Williams was the co-founder of the National League of Colored Women (which later became the National Association of Colored Women).

Fannie Barrier Williams, educator and social reformer, was born in Williams was the co-founder of the National League of Colored Women (which later became the National Association of Colored Women).

"In 1860, an 11-year-old girl named Grace Bedell wrote a letter to Abe Lincoln. 'Dear Sir...if you let your whiskers grow...you would look a great deal better for your face is so thin. All the ladies like whiskers and they would tease their husbands to vote for you and then you would be President...'" He wrote back, and soon stopped shaving. "On his inaugural train ride from Illinois to Washington, D.C., the president-elect stopped in Bedell’s hometown of Westfield, N.Y., and asked to meet…

theweekmagazine: “ In an girl wrote to Abe Lincoln, suggesting he grow a beard. He not only responded, he obliged. “Hon A B Lincoln… Dear Sir My father has just home from the fair.

Miller wears a special helmet to accommodate her camera as a war correspondent in World War II. (The photographer is unknown.)

Lee Miller, Civilian War Correspondent (Vogue Magazine), wears a special helmet to accommodate her Anniversary Speed Graphic camera.

Ida B Wells. Journalist, Anti-Lynching and women's rights campaigner, founder of the Women's Era Club and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

Ida B Wells (July 1862 - March - Journalist, Anti-Lynching and women's rights campaigner, founder of the Women's Era Club and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

Carrie Chapman Catt, a member of Pi Beta Phi at Iowa State University. Catt was a notable women’s suffragist and founded the League of Women Voters.

Photo Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society . In this portrait taken in Carrie Chapman Catt is proudly wearing her.

Maria Ridulph was kidnapped on a street corner in Sycamore, Illinois on December 3, 1957. She was 7 years old at the time. Her body was discovered in a field 5 months later. The case went cold for 55 years until Jack McCullough formerly John Tessier was arrested in July 2011. It is believed that the case involved the oldest unsolved murder resulting in an arrest in the United States

54 years after killing, arrest made in murder of 7-year-old Illinois girl

Grimke Sisters were some of the first women to act in American social reform movements. Their father, chief judge of the Supreme Court of S.C. was strong on slavery and subordination of women. Raised on a plantation, saw slavery. They started working for the abolition movement, learned just how powerless women were in politics. Were the first women to address the Mass. state legislature, causing a scandal, but attracted thousands. Lived to see the slaves freed and to vote themselves.

4 Famous Sets of Sisters Who Changed History

Sarah & Angelina Grimke, born to a slave-owning supreme-court judge in Charleston. They fled north, where their deep personal revulsion of slavery led them to become the first females to speak in public in the US.

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