John Crome (1768 – 1821) by Michael William Sharp  Crome was an English landscape artist of the Romantic era, and founding member of the Norwich School of painters. He worked in watercolour and oil. His oil paintings number in excess of 300. Many can be seen at major galleries around the world, including the Tate Gallery and the Royal Academy, but he is well represented in Norwich at the Castle Museum and Art Gallery. He produced etchings and taught art.

John Crome (1768 – 1821) by Michael William Sharp Crome was an English landscape artist of the Romantic era, and founding member of the Norwich School of painters. He worked in watercolour and oil. His oil paintings number in excess of 300. Many can be seen at major galleries around the world, including the Tate Gallery and the Royal Academy, but he is well represented in Norwich at the Castle Museum and Art Gallery. He produced etchings and taught art.

Charles Rennie Mackintosh, c. 1900, in his early thirties. This handsome Scot was responsible for some of the most beautiful design of the Arts & Crafts movement in the UK. His artistic temperament can be seen in the devil-may-care tying of his cravat. Submitted by thenewmessiah

Charles Rennie Mackintosh, c. 1900, in his early thirties. This handsome Scot was responsible for some of the most beautiful design of the Arts & Crafts movement in the UK. His artistic temperament can be seen in the devil-may-care tying of his cravat. Submitted by thenewmessiah

Facial composite of Mozart, circa 1777, created by the German Federal Criminal Police Office from four contemporary portait paintings.

Facial composite of Mozart, circa 1777, created by the German Federal Criminal Police Office from four contemporary portait paintings.

The recent discovery of an unpublished D.H. Lawrence letter proves that he’s got your back, ladies. Writing in response to a misogynistic 1924 article titled “The Ugliness of Women,” Lawrence lay down the law:    The hideousness {the author] sees is the reflection of himself, and of the automatic meat-lust with which he approaches another individual…Even the most “beautiful” woman is still a human creature. If {the author] approached her as such, as a being instead of ...

The recent discovery of an unpublished D.H. Lawrence letter proves that he’s got your back, ladies. Writing in response to a misogynistic 1924 article titled “The Ugliness of Women,” Lawrence lay down the law: The hideousness {the author] sees is the reflection of himself, and of the automatic meat-lust with which he approaches another individual…Even the most “beautiful” woman is still a human creature. If {the author] approached her as such, as a being instead of ...

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