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Texas Ranger Phillip Cuney “P.C.” Baird, a legendary lawman known as the “Old Sleuth,” was finally honored in 2012 for his valiant service to his home state.- Courtesy James Baird Family -

Texas Ranger Phillip Cuney “P.C.” Baird, a legendary lawman known as the “Old Sleuth,” was finally honored in 2012 for his valiant service to his home state.- Courtesy James Baird Family -

This photo of Samuel H. “Sam” Newberry is great because it shows the Texas Ranger making the transition to professionalism, through dress. But even though he looks quite natty in this photo, folks could tell he was a dangerous man. Typically, as most lawmen would, Newberry made sure the shutterbug had the Ranger’s six-shooter Colt and fancy Mexican Loop holster and cartridge belt in the frame. Courtesy Texas Ranger Research Center, Texas Ranger Hall of Fame & Museum

This photo of Samuel H. “Sam” Newberry is great because it shows the Texas Ranger making the transition to professionalism, through dress. But even though he looks quite natty in this photo, folks could tell he was a dangerous man. Typically, as most lawmen would, Newberry made sure the shutterbug had the Ranger’s six-shooter Colt and fancy Mexican Loop holster and cartridge belt in the frame. Courtesy Texas Ranger Research Center, Texas Ranger Hall of Fame & Museum

Mountain Man......Stephen Meek, was born on the 4th of July, 1805 in Virginia. At the age of 20 he entered the services of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company in St. Louis, Missouri. He left his moccasin tracks all over the West, from Yellowstone to the Arkansas. A free trapper he hired out with the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1835 and passed through the Umpqua region for the first time in 1836.

Mountain Man......Stephen Meek, was born on the 4th of July, 1805 in Virginia. At the age of 20 he entered the services of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company in St. Louis, Missouri. He left his moccasin tracks all over the West, from Yellowstone to the Arkansas. A free trapper he hired out with the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1835 and passed through the Umpqua region for the first time in 1836.

Saving a Hero's Place is a non-profit memorial society honoring law enforcement and first responders who have given their lives in the line of duty. They provide handmade memorials, usually a symbolic "empty chair," to the agencies at which the officers served as an enduring reminder of their sacrifice. An Honor Chair memorializing all fallen Texas Rangers since 1823 was presented to the Texas Rangers during a Texas Ranger In-Service event on Wednesday, October 7, 2015.

Saving a Hero's Place is a non-profit memorial society honoring law enforcement and first responders who have given their lives in the line of duty. They provide handmade memorials, usually a symbolic "empty chair," to the agencies at which the officers served as an enduring reminder of their sacrifice. An Honor Chair memorializing all fallen Texas Rangers since 1823 was presented to the Texas Rangers during a Texas Ranger In-Service event on Wednesday, October 7, 2015.

A daguerrotype of Texas ranger captain Samuel Hamilton Walker, 1846. He is probably best known as the co-inventor, along with Samuel Colt, of the famous Walker Colt revolver.

A daguerrotype of Texas ranger captain Samuel Hamilton Walker, 1846. He is probably best known as the co-inventor, along with Samuel Colt, of the famous Walker Colt revolver.

American Gunfighter Sometimes Lawman of the Old West, Shotgun Collins

American Gunfighter Sometimes Lawman of the Old West, Shotgun Collins

John Selman, the man who shot and killed John Wesley Hardin in the Acme Saloon Bar in El Paso in August, 1895.

John Selman, the man who shot and killed John Wesley Hardin in the Acme Saloon Bar in El Paso in August, 1895.

First Cowboy Hero of Fiction Born in Fredericksburg, Texas, in 1857, William Levi “Buck” Taylor grew up to be the “King of the Cowboys.” He gained notoriety performing cowboy stunts for Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West show and became the first cowboy hero of fiction in an 1887 dime novel written by Prentiss Ingraham. He wears his signature red shirt and embroidered sombrero in this circa 1890 publicity photograph. – Courtesy Robert G. McCubbin collection –

First Cowboy Hero of Fiction Born in Fredericksburg, Texas, in 1857, William Levi “Buck” Taylor grew up to be the “King of the Cowboys.” He gained notoriety performing cowboy stunts for Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West show and became the first cowboy hero of fiction in an 1887 dime novel written by Prentiss Ingraham. He wears his signature red shirt and embroidered sombrero in this circa 1890 publicity photograph. – Courtesy Robert G. McCubbin collection –

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