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Frida Kahlo Self-portrait in a Velvet Dress, 1926 (detail)

-Frida Kahlo- self-portrait to the velvet dress'   (So she painted this first table to her fiancé Alejandro Gómez Arias, who had left. 1926)

-Frida Kahlo- self-portrait to the velvet dress' (So she painted this first table to her fiancé Alejandro Gómez Arias, who had left. 1926)

Self-portrait in a velvet dress, Frida Kahlo (1926)

Self-portrait in a velvet dress, Frida Kahlo (1926)

Self Portrait in a Velvet Dress: The Fashion of Frida Kahlo - a beautifully photographed book of Frida Kahlo’s wardrobe.

Self Portrait in a Velvet Dress: The Fashion of Frida Kahlo - a beautifully photographed book of Frida Kahlo’s wardrobe.

Self-portrait in a Velvet Dress - Frida Kahlo - The Athenaeum

Self-portrait in a Velvet Dress - Frida Kahlo - The Athenaeum

she >really< saw her own beauty ... [ged]    self-portrait wearing a velvet dress, Frida Kahlo (Source: persefonea, via beverleyshiller)    (Source: persefonea, via beverleyshiller)

she >really< saw her own beauty ... [ged] self-portrait wearing a velvet dress, Frida Kahlo (Source: persefonea, via beverleyshiller) (Source: persefonea, via beverleyshiller)

Frida Kahlo Braided Headpiece by The Velvet Mode | Como hacer el peinado de Frida usando estambre y listones

Frida Kahlo Braided Headpiece by The Velvet Mode | Como hacer el peinado de Frida usando estambre y listones

Self Portrait in a Velvet Dress, 1926 - Frida Kahlo's first self-portrait, first given to her student boyfriend Alejandro Gomez Arias. The aristocratic pose reflects Frida's interest in the paintings of the Italian Renaissance period. This self-portrait is Frida's interpretation of Botticelli's "Venus." When Arias' parents separated them, he returned the painting, and it was one of the four that she showed to Diego Rivera to first ask his opinion of her work.

Self Portrait in a Velvet Dress, 1926 - Frida Kahlo's first self-portrait, first given to her student boyfriend Alejandro Gomez Arias. The aristocratic pose reflects Frida's interest in the paintings of the Italian Renaissance period. This self-portrait is Frida's interpretation of Botticelli's "Venus." When Arias' parents separated them, he returned the painting, and it was one of the four that she showed to Diego Rivera to first ask his opinion of her work.

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