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El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches, but other important monuments include the Arroyo Group, the North and South Ballcourts and the palaces of Tajín Chico

El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches, but other important monuments include the Arroyo Group, the North and South Ballcourts and the palaces of Tajín Chico

El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches, but other important monuments include the Arroyo Group, the North and South Ballcourts and the palaces of Tajín Chico

El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches, but other important monuments include the Arroyo Group, the North and South Ballcourts and the palaces of Tajín Chico

El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches, but other important monuments include the Arroyo Group, the North and South Ballcourts and the palaces of Tajín Chico

El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches, but other important monuments include the Arroyo Group, the North and South Ballcourts and the palaces of Tajín Chico

El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches, but other important monuments include the Arroyo Group, the North and South Ballcourts and the palaces of Tajín Chico

El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches, but other important monuments include the Arroyo Group, the North and South Ballcourts and the palaces of Tajín Chico

El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches, but other important monuments include the Arroyo Group, the North and South Ballcourts and the palaces of Tajín Chico

El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches, but other important monuments include the Arroyo Group, the North and South Ballcourts and the palaces of Tajín Chico

El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches, but other important monuments include the Arroyo Group, the North and South Ballcourts and the palaces of Tajín Chico

El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches, but other important monuments include the Arroyo Group, the North and South Ballcourts and the palaces of Tajín Chico

El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches

El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches

El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches

El Tajín was named a World Heritage site in 1992, due to its cultural importance and its architecture.[3] This architecture includes the use of decorative niches and cement in forms unknown in the rest of Mesoamerica.[4] Its best-known monument is the Pyramid of the Niches

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