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There is no excuse.  Maps are the best surveillance tool.  Outside federal government, CDC/NIH settings,the number of health insurance/electronic medical records data companies using GIS to understand or monitor people's health is close to zero. The results of a survey I did of 200 companies, 154 replies, are illustrated.  None regularly map population health; a few use maps for occasional reporting.  [HIT=Health Info Tech; BD=medical Big Data.  Federal and GIS/RS companies excluded.]

There is no excuse. Maps are the best surveillance tool. Outside federal government, CDC/NIH settings,the number of health insurance/electronic medical records data companies using GIS to understand or monitor people's health is close to zero. The results of a survey I did of 200 companies, 154 replies, are illustrated. None regularly map population health; a few use maps for occasional reporting. [HIT=Health Info Tech; BD=medical Big Data. Federal and GIS/RS companies excluded.]

Why NPHG?  We hear a lot about managed care and its role in people's health.  But none of the major companies providing managed care produce effective surveillance programs or tools.  Many like to think they do, a program here or there for asthma, diabetes, teen age pregnancy, but an effective program monitors much more--hundreds to thousands of health indicators.  None of the insurance companies are accomplishing what NPHG can do.  125k+ disease maps/year.

Why NPHG? We hear a lot about managed care and its role in people's health. But none of the major companies providing managed care produce effective surveillance programs or tools. Many like to think they do, a program here or there for asthma, diabetes, teen age pregnancy, but an effective program monitors much more--hundreds to thousands of health indicators. None of the insurance companies are accomplishing what NPHG can do. 125k+ disease maps/year.

Measuring Innovations, Early Review: based on an ongoing survey I developed 2 years ago, and contacts made with C*Os, VPs, managers, directors, HR, the companies depicted in this map lack the technology and knowledge base required for local and national health mapping (this is updated regularly).  With the exception of the building in Calif., these are the big data, IS, and health insurance companies not ready to perform detailed health surveillance in spite of recent HIT advances.

Measuring Innovations, Early Review: based on an ongoing survey I developed 2 years ago, and contacts made with C*Os, VPs, managers, directors, HR, the companies depicted in this map lack the technology and knowledge base required for local and national health mapping (this is updated regularly). With the exception of the building in Calif., these are the big data, IS, and health insurance companies not ready to perform detailed health surveillance in spite of recent HIT advances.

Childhood violence is one of those coded pieces of medical data that is very easy to map.  Yet, very few facilities, programs, insurance companies and MCOs map important public and social health information like this diagnosis.  Mapping such information would certainly change our perspective of health care in general, not to mention the many companies that to date are simply not engaged in this level of community health concern.

Childhood violence is one of those coded pieces of medical data that is very easy to map. Yet, very few facilities, programs, insurance companies and MCOs map important public and social health information like this diagnosis. Mapping such information would certainly change our perspective of health care in general, not to mention the many companies that to date are simply not engaged in this level of community health concern.

In 1874, the first disease maps were generated by an insurance company with the goal of better predicting population health and longevity.  No further advances in disease mapping were subsequently made by the insurance agencies.  In the 1890s, the value of maps diminished due to a change in focus initiated by the bacteria/microbial theory.  Insurance companies have since remained well behind in the technology of disease mapping and GIS.

In 1874, the first disease maps were generated by an insurance company with the goal of better predicting population health and longevity. No further advances in disease mapping were subsequently made by the insurance agencies. In the 1890s, the value of maps diminished due to a change in focus initiated by the bacteria/microbial theory. Insurance companies have since remained well behind in the technology of disease mapping and GIS.

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