The U.S. Navy's Cryptanalytic Bombe is the culmination of years of work and the efforts of mathematicians and engineers from Poland, England, and the United States. It was the solution to the problem of the German's World War II cipher machine Enigma, and it led to the Allies' successes in the battle of the Atlantic and the war in Europe.

The U.S. Navy's Cryptanalytic Bombe is the culmination of years of work and the efforts of mathematicians and engineers from Poland, England, and the United States. It was the solution to the problem of the German's World War II cipher machine Enigma, and it led to the Allies' successes in the battle of the Atlantic and the war in Europe.

Enigma Machine - Enigma Machine    During World War II, the Germans used the Enigma, a cipher machine, to develop nearly unbreakable codes for sending messages. The Enigma's settings offered 150,000,000,000,000,000,000 possible solutions, yet the Allies were eventually able to crack its code. By end of the war, 10 percent of all German Enigma communications were decoded at Bletchley Park, in England, on the world’s first electromagnetic computers.

Enigma Machine - Enigma Machine During World War II, the Germans used the Enigma, a cipher machine, to develop nearly unbreakable codes for sending messages. The Enigma's settings offered 150,000,000,000,000,000,000 possible solutions, yet the Allies were eventually able to crack its code. By end of the war, 10 percent of all German Enigma communications were decoded at Bletchley Park, in England, on the world’s first electromagnetic computers.

Very Rare WWII Enigma Cipher Machine. This highly important three-rotor Enigma deciphering machine was used by the Nazis during World War II. It is believed that acquisition of an Enigma, and the subsequent deciphering of the German codes by the Allies, shortened the war in Europe by at least two years. Examples of Enigma machines are exceptionally rare and almost all known models are in museums.

Very Rare WWII Enigma Cipher Machine. This highly important three-rotor Enigma deciphering machine was used by the Nazis during World War II. It is believed that acquisition of an Enigma, and the subsequent deciphering of the German codes by the Allies, shortened the war in Europe by at least two years. Examples of Enigma machines are exceptionally rare and almost all known models are in museums.

The Enigma machine was invented by the German engineer Arthur Scherbius at the end of World War I. It was used extensively in World War II for cryptography.

The Enigma machine was invented by the German engineer Arthur Scherbius at the end of World War I. It was used extensively in World War II for cryptography.

Undeterred by recent bombings, London residents visit what’s left of a library during World War II.

21 Photos Of People Being Wonderful Throughout History

Undeterred by recent bombings, London residents visit what’s left of a library during World War II.

The Schwimmwagen was a German amphibious, all-wheel-drive vehicle. They were massed produced during World War II and were widely used by the German ground units. Over 15,000 were built

The Schwimmwagen was a German amphibious, all-wheel-drive vehicle. They were massed produced during World War II and were widely used by the German ground units. Over 15,000 were built

Women At Work During World War II.

Women At Work During World War II

Codename Purple by the United States, was a diplomatic cryptographic machine used by the Japanese Foreign Office just before and during World War II.  The machine was an electromechanical stepping-switch device.  The information gained from decryption was eventually code-named Magic within the US government.  The codename “Purple” referred to binders used by US cryptanalysts for material produced by various systems; it replaced the Red machine used by the Japanese Foreign Office.

Codename Purple by the United States, was a diplomatic cryptographic machine used by the Japanese Foreign Office just before and during World War II. The machine was an electromechanical stepping-switch device. The information gained from decryption was eventually code-named Magic within the US government. The codename “Purple” referred to binders used by US cryptanalysts for material produced by various systems; it replaced the Red machine used by the Japanese Foreign Office.

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