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1. Abolitionists sold pictures showing light-skinned slave children to raise money for schools. (U.S. Library of Congress)

White and black child-In 1863 and eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions.

100 years before Rosa Parks there was Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (1825-1911). She was an author, poet and abolitionist. Born free in Baltimore, she had a prolific career, publishing her first book of poetry at age 20 and her first novel (Iola Leroy) at age 67. In 1850, she became the first woman to teach sewing at the Union Seminary. In 1851, she helped blacks along the Underground Railroad en route to Canada, running from the  Fugitive Slave Law of 1850.

100 years before Rosa Parks there was Frances Ellen Watkins Harper She was an author, poet and abolitionist. Born free in Baltimore, she had a prolific career, publishing her first book of poetry at age 20 and her first novel (Iola Leroy) at

An Ashamed Mother Puts Her Four Children Up For Sale in Chicago, 1948 – And The Story Behind The Picture

vintage everyday: An Ashamed Mother Puts Her Four Children Up For Sale in Chicago, 1948 – And The Story Behind The Picture

AIN'T I A WOMAN?  Sojourner Truth and the Liberation of America's Smallest Women

AIN’T I A WOMAN? Sojourner Truth, and the Liberation of America’s Smallest Women

July 26 - Abolitionist and women’s rights activist Sojourner Truth delivered her most famous speech “Ain’t I a Woman?” at a women’s rights conference in Akron, Ohio. It became a classic speech of the women’s rights movement.

Portrait of “Bright” Oscar Moore Anderson, New...

Creator : Anderson, New York. Other Creator : Simpson, Randolph Linsly, ca. Full length portrait of "Bright" Oscar Moore, young boy in velvet suit and elaborate lace collar and cuffs. From: Randolph Linsly Simpson African-American collection.

first white women in U.S. was tattooed by Indians after be captured by Indians. The tattoo is called "dirty mouth" meaning she slept around    name Olive Oatman, 1858. After her family was killed by Yavapais Indians, on a trip West in the eighteen-fifties, she was adopted and raised by Mohave Indians, who gave her a traditional tribal tattoo. When she was ransomed back, at age nineteen, she became a celebrity. Photograph courtesy of the Arizona Historical Society, Tucson, 1927.

Olive Oatman was the first white tattooed woman in the history of the United States. ~ Olive Oatman was 13 when she travelled from Illinois to California with her Mormon family.

Seminole woman with baby, circa 1905. Original copyright by John Chamberlin. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division,

Seminole woman with baby, circa Original copyright by John Chamberlin. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division,

The three women pictured in this incredible photograph from 1885 -- Anandibai Joshi of India, Keiko Okami of Japan, and Sabat Islambouli of Syria -- each became the first licensed female doctors in their respective countries. The three were students at the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania; one of the only places in the world at the time where women could study medicine. - http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/08/19th-century-women-medical-school_n_5093603.html

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia (now known as Drexel University College of Medicine).

The 'white' slave children of New Orleans: Images of pale mixed-race slaves used to drum up sympathy among wealthy donors in 1860s    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/The-white-slave-children-New-Orleans-Images-pale-mixed-race-slaves-used-drum-sympathy-funds-wealthy-donors-1860s.

The 'white' slave children of New Orleans: Images of pale mixed-race slaves used to drum up sympathy among wealthy donors in 1860s

Fundraiser organizers used lighter skinned mixed race slave children as part of an campaign to raise money for African American schools in the They believed that lighter skinned slaves would garner more sympathy, and in turn more money, for their cause.

Former slave an African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist Sojourner Truth and Abraham Lincoln 1864. Description from pinterest.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

Look at the beauty of this woman. How does she manage this, given her circumstances? // Photo Archives -- Ex Slaves & early Century Photos) - Asif Zamir

Morris Engel

1947 African American girls walking the streets of Harlem, NYC, Photo by Morris Engel.

The great abolitionist Frederick Douglass and his grandson Joseph.  Photo: Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture by Selkie~gal

"The great American abolitionist Frederick Douglass and his grandson, Joseph." Photo: Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture

In the early 1860s, photographs of children dubbed "white" slaves were circulated as part of a campaign to raise money for public schools for emancipated slaves. New Orleans was the one city in the South where the lines of demarcation between races was alwasy the most fluid

The 'white' slave children of New Orleans: Images of pale mixed-race slaves used to drum up sympathy among wealthy donors in 1860s

Emancipated slave children from New Orleans draped in the American flag, Charles Paxson, photographer, New York, 1870 (Propaganda?

Miss Edna Earl Gaston & Friend

Photo 1925 North Carolina "Black Girl & Doll Carriage"

Edna Earl Gaston Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina postcards in the North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Even her baby doll is black. What a beautiful little girl!

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