Robert Tenorio displays his Santa Domingo Pueblo pottery at the Santa Fe Indian Market in Santa Fe, New Mexico, August 20, 2011. REUTERS/Mar...

Robert Tenorio displays his Santa Domingo Pueblo pottery at the Santa Fe Indian Market in Santa Fe, New Mexico, August 20, 2011. REUTERS/Mar...

Watch For Rocks....in Waldo Canyon...might want to watch out for people with rifles too, I reckon, by the looks of that sign...

Watch For Rocks....in Waldo Canyon...might want to watch out for people with rifles too, I reckon, by the looks of that sign...

Robert Tenorio of Santo Domingo Pueblo

Robert Tenorio of Santo Domingo Pueblo

Weaved Baskets - Folk Art Festival, Santa Fe, NM

Weaved Baskets - Folk Art Festival, Santa Fe, NM

Robert Tenorio(b.1950) of Santo Domingo (Kewa Pueblo) is one of the foremost Pueblo potters working today and has played an extremely important role in reviving and bringing attention to the legacy of Santo Domingo pottery. He first learned the fundamentals of working with clay at the age of ten from family members, including his grandmother Andrea Ortiz. Today he is known for his polychrome pots created in the traditional Santo Domingo style...

Robert Tenorio(b.1950) of Santo Domingo (Kewa Pueblo) is one of the foremost Pueblo potters working today and has played an extremely important role in reviving and bringing attention to the legacy of Santo Domingo pottery. He first learned the fundamentals of working with clay at the age of ten from family members, including his grandmother Andrea Ortiz. Today he is known for his polychrome pots created in the traditional Santo Domingo style...

To the Apache people, the Clown is a sacred being with great power given to him by Thunder; he represents just what the power of thunder provokes, fear from a tremendous power in the sky, greater than anything that we see on the earth. In this way, the manner of the Clown "fooling around" is anything but trite; instead, this is a serious spiritual element to a ceremony reflecting the randomness of misfortune in his seemingly mad behavior, just as nature reminds us of our own mortality....

To the Apache people, the Clown is a sacred being with great power given to him by Thunder; he represents just what the power of thunder provokes, fear from a tremendous power in the sky, greater than anything that we see on the earth. In this way, the manner of the Clown "fooling around" is anything but trite; instead, this is a serious spiritual element to a ceremony reflecting the randomness of misfortune in his seemingly mad behavior, just as nature reminds us of our own mortality....

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