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Stock detective Mike Shonsey stands with a Winchester 1886 rifle that played a role in the Johnson County War. When Shonsey heard that Nate Champion’s brother, Dudley, was looking to avenge Nate’s death, he shot Dudley dead, possibly with the shown rifle, then turned himself in for the killing, claiming self-defense.

Stock detective Mike Shonsey stands with a Winchester 1886 rifle that played a role in the Johnson County War. When Shonsey heard that Nate Champion’s brother, Dudley, was looking to avenge Nate’s death, he shot Dudley dead, possibly with the shown rifle, then turned himself in for the killing, claiming self-defense.

Frank Stilwell, involved in the events regarding the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, 10/26/1881, and was suspected in the murder of Morgan Earp on 3/18/1882. Two days after Morgan's death, Frank Stilwell was killed by Wyatt Earp in a Tucson train yard. Murder indictments were issued for Wyatt Earp, Doc Holiday, Warren Earp, Sherman McMaster and John Johnson. Earp fled the Arizona Territory for Colorado. Wyatt Earp admitted late in his life to killing Stilwell at close range with a shotgun.

Frank Stilwell, involved in the events regarding the Gunfight at the O. Corral, and was suspected in the murder of Morgan Earp on

Nate Champion, who ran a small herd of cattle in the Hole-in-the-Wall country, was killed by the invaders of Johnson County, on April 9, 1892, in a very one-sided shootout.  He was the most significant casualty in the Johnson County War.

Nate Champion, who ran a small herd of cattle in the Hole-in-the-Wall country, was murdered by the invaders of Johnson County April Courtesy Jim Gatchell Memorial Museum.

Reminds me of my 'Indian Captive' historical fiction days in Junior High.   The true story of Olive Oatman, captive white girl in the Old West.

Olive Oatman: More Than the Girl with the Chin Tattoo

Olive Oatman was "the first white tattooed woman in the history of the United States." ~ Olive Oatman was 13 when she travelled from Illinois to California with her Mormon family. On the journey, the family wer

Mike Shonsey Member of the Johnson County Invaders aka Wolcott's Regulators

The rifle was fired by Mike Shonsey in the Johnson County War

Deputy U.S. Marshal Edward W. Johnson, left, lost his right arm soon after this photograph was taken. He’s standing beside Texas Ranger Lorenzo K. Creekman and Parker County Deputy Sheriff E.A. Hutchison.  – Courtesy George T. Jackson, Jr. –

Deputy U. Marshal Edward W. Johnson, left, lost his right arm soon after this photograph was taken. He’s standing beside Texas Ranger Lorenzo K. Creekman and Parker County Deputy Sheriff E. – Courtesy George T.

Andrew S. "Arapahoe" Brown

Johnson County War--Wyoming Tales and Trails II

Johnson County War - WOW.com

Johnson County War - WOW.com

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