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Spider, Hubble Space Telescope

Credit: NASA/ESA - Hubble has taken this stunning close-up shot of part of the Tarantula Nebula. This star-forming region of ionised hydrogen gas is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small galaxy which neighbours the Milky Way.

This star-forming region of ionised hydrogen gas is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small galaxy which neighbours the Milky Way. It is home to many extreme conditions including supernova remnants and the heaviest star ever found. The Ta

whirpool galaxy

The Whirlpool Galaxy, a classic spiral galaxy, is pictured in this NASA handout photo. At only 30 million light years distant and fully 60 thousand light years across, also known as NGC is one of the brightest and most picturesque galaxies on the sky.

The Tarantula Nebula is a spectacular formation named for its spidery shape. Home to half a million young stars, it is 170,000 light years from Earth, and in fact lies outside of the Milky Way altogether

Deep-Space Photos: Hubble's Greatest Hits - Photo Essays

30 Doradus is the brightest star-forming region visible in a neighboring galaxy and home to the most massive stars ever seen. The nebula resides light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small, satellite galaxy of our Milky Way.

Several million young stars are vying for attention in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a raucous stellar breeding ground in 30 Doradus, located in the heart of the Tarantula Nebula. Early astronomers nicknamed the nebula because its glowing filaments resemble spider legs.

Several million young stars are vying for attention in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image

A massive cluster of yellowish galaxies is seemingly caught in a spider web of eerily distorted background galaxies in the left-hand image, taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

is an enormous stellar nursery about light-years away in the Perseus Arm, one of the Milky Way galaxy's main spiral arms as seen by ESA's Herschel space observatory.

NEBULA RED SPIDER | NGC 6537 is a planetary nebula in the constellation Sagittarius about 1,900 light years distant from Earth. It is also known by the name of Red Spider Nebula.

Red Spider Nebula - This extremely warm nebula is home to one of the hottest known stars in the universe and it generates stellar winds with waves over 100 billion km high.

To celebrate its 22nd anniversary in orbit, the Hubble Space Telescope has released a dramatic new image of the star-forming region 30 Doradus, also known as the Tarantula Nebula because its glowing filaments resemble spider legs. A new image from all three of NASA’s Great Observatories – Chandra, Hubble, and Spitzer – has also been created to mark the event.

The Tarantula Nebula in a composite image that combines data from three telescopes: Chandra (blue), Hubble (green), and Spitzer (red). The nebula is one of the largest star-forming regions in our cosmic backyard-Photograph: Chandra X-ray Observatory

Hubble Snaps Breathtaking Views of Colorful Veil Nebula (Photos, Video)

Veil Nebula Supernova Remnant NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has unveiled in stunning detail a small section of the expanding remains of a massive star that exploded about years ago. Called the Veil Nebula, the debris is one of the best-known superno

Cosmic Zoom Lens  A massive cluster of yellowish galaxies seemingly caught in a spider web of distorted background galaxies  Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope  Gravity of the cluster's trillion stars acts as a cosmic "zoom lens," bending & magnifying the light of the galaxies located far behind it, a technique called gravitational lensing  Faraway galaxies appear in the Hubble image as arc-shaped objects around cluster Abell 1689  Image Credit: NASA

Cosmic Zoom Lens A massive cluster of yellowish galaxies seemingly caught in a spider web of distorted background galaxies Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope Gravity of the cluster's trillion stars acts as a cosmic "zoom lens," bending & magnifying the light of the galaxies located far behind it, a technique called gravitational lensing Faraway galaxies appear in the Hubble image as arc-shaped objects around cluster Abell 1689 Image Credit: NASA

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