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Annie Dodge Wauneka. Wauneka received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Lyndon Johnson in 1963. Born April 10, 1910, she was the daughter of Henry Chee Dodge, first tribal chairman of the Navajo Tribe, and became the first woman to sit on the Navajo Tribal Council.

Annie Dodge Wauneka. Wauneka received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Lyndon Johnson in 1963. Born April 10, 1910, she was the daughter of Henry Chee Dodge, first tribal chairman of the Navajo Tribe, and became the first woman to sit on the Navajo Tribal Council.

"Guess what they had on the menu? Indian fry bread! Yep. For five dollars... Crazy! They had the fry bread on this fancy plate and I ate it with this fancy fork and knife. And I just kept imagining there was some Flathead Indian grandma in the kitchen, just making fry bread for all the room service people. It was a dream come true."  (Photo not attributed to Flathead Indian tribe)

"Guess what they had on the menu? Indian fry bread! Yep. For five dollars... Crazy! They had the fry bread on this fancy plate and I ate it with this fancy fork and knife. And I just kept imagining there was some Flathead Indian grandma in the kitchen, just making fry bread for all the room service people. It was a dream come true." (Photo not attributed to Flathead Indian tribe)

Navajo Indians: Matriarchal Society - Nizhoni Ranch Gallery

Navajo Land and People

native american navajo tribe | the navajo nation for more information on the navajo people please ...

native american navajo tribe | the navajo nation for more information on the navajo people please ...

Navajo Runner, Alvina Begay qualifies for Olympic trials #running

Navajo Runner, Alvina Begay qualifies for Olympic trials #running

Betty Manygoats learned to make pottery by watching her grandmother, Grace Barlow, and she may have had some influence from her Aunt Rose Williams. A few of her 9 daughters are also potters. Betty is well known for her horny toad effigies and wedding vases.The first couple of pieces I purchased when I was first captivated by Navajo pottery were by the Manygoats family.

Betty Manygoats learned to make pottery by watching her grandmother, Grace Barlow, and she may have had some influence from her Aunt Rose Williams. A few of her 9 daughters are also potters. Betty is well known for her horny toad effigies and wedding vases.The first couple of pieces I purchased when I was first captivated by Navajo pottery were by the Manygoats family.

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