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Draco.  Athenian statesman who, in 594 BCE, first wrote down the laws of Athens, but made them very harsh. Draco did not actually create most of the laws, but only wrote them down so that judges would apply the laws consistently. Draco's laws were very harsh, and prescribed the death penalty even for minor offenses. The laws also allowed debtors to be sold into slavery. Superseded by the laws of Solon, several decades later.

Draco. Athenian statesman who, in 594 BCE, first wrote down the laws of Athens, but made them very harsh. Draco did not actually create most of the laws, but only wrote them down so that judges would apply the laws consistently. Draco's laws were very harsh, and prescribed the death penalty even for minor offenses. The laws also allowed debtors to be sold into slavery. Superseded by the laws of Solon, several decades later.

Thucydides * Ancient Greek historian and author of the History of the Peloponnesian War, which recounts the 5th-century B.C. War between Sparta and Athens.

Thucydides * Ancient Greek historian and author of the History of the Peloponnesian War, which recounts the 5th-century B.C. War between Sparta and Athens.

Pericles was the most prominent and influential Greek statesmen, orator, and general of Athens during the city's Golden Age—specifically, the time between the Persian and Peloponnesian wars.  Born: 495 BC, Athens  Died: 429 BC, Athens  Partner: Aspasia  Parents: Xanthippus, Agariste  Children: Pericles the Younger, Paralus, Xanthippus.  Wikipedia

Pericles: the Wonderful Tyrant

Pericles was the most prominent and influential Greek statesmen, orator, and general of Athens during the city's Golden Age—specifically, the time between the Persian and Peloponnesian wars. Born: 495 BC, Athens Died: 429 BC, Athens Partner: Aspasia Parents: Xanthippus, Agariste Children: Pericles the Younger, Paralus, Xanthippus. Wikipedia

An Exceptional Greek Silver Tetradrachm of Athens (Attica). Circa 500/490-485/0 BC.

An Exceptional Greek Silver Tetradrachm of Athens (Attica). Circa 500/490-485/0 BC.

The bust of Xanthippus, who led the Athenians to victory over the Persians at Mycale (479 BC), reveals that the brow-piece of his helmet was adorned with a 16-ray Pan-Hellenic #Vergina Sun burst of #Macedonia and the rest of #Greece.. Xanthippus was the father of Pericles, the great Athenian statesman of the ‘Golden Age’ of Athens:

The bust of Xanthippus, who led the Athenians to victory over the Persians at Mycale (479 BC), reveals that the brow-piece of his helmet was adorned with a 16-ray Pan-Hellenic #Vergina Sun burst of #Macedonia and the rest of #Greece.. Xanthippus was the father of Pericles, the great Athenian statesman of the ‘Golden Age’ of Athens:

Ostrakon with name of Themistocles, son of Neokleos, who was sent into exile, from vote of condemnation, 482 BC, from Acropolis of Athens. Greek civilization, 5th century BC. Museum (Archaeological Museum)

Ostrakon with name of Themistocles, son of Neokleos, who was sent into exile, from vote of condemnation, 482 BC, from Acropolis of Athens. Greek civilization, 5th century BC. Museum (Archaeological Museum)

Themistocles, the Victor of the Battle of Salamis. The allied Greek fleet was commanded by the Spartan Eurybiades, a surprising choice considering it was Athens who was the great naval power and supplied by far the most ships. The two other senior commanders were Themistocles of Athens and Adeimantus of Corinth. In effect, tactics and strategy were decided by a council of 17 commanders from each of the contributing contingents.

Themistocles, the Victor of the Battle of Salamis. The allied Greek fleet was commanded by the Spartan Eurybiades, a surprising choice considering it was Athens who was the great naval power and supplied by far the most ships. The two other senior commanders were Themistocles of Athens and Adeimantus of Corinth. In effect, tactics and strategy were decided by a council of 17 commanders from each of the contributing contingents.

A Rare Greek Silver Didrachm of Athens (Attica), Among the Finest Known. Didrachm circa 475-465 B.C. The owl didrachms of Athens are now generally attributed to c.475-465 B.C., a period that found Athens under the influence of Cimon, son of Miltiades, the hero of Marathon. Though he had to battle opponents such as Themistocles and Pericles, Cimon was central to the rise of Athenian power in the 470s and 460s.

A Rare Greek Silver Didrachm of Athens (Attica), Among the Finest Known. Didrachm circa 475-465 B.C. The owl didrachms of Athens are now generally attributed to c.475-465 B.C., a period that found Athens under the influence of Cimon, son of Miltiades, the hero of Marathon. Though he had to battle opponents such as Themistocles and Pericles, Cimon was central to the rise of Athenian power in the 470s and 460s.

didoofcarthage: “ Chariot group from the south frieze of the Parthenon The Acropolis, Athens, Greece, c. 438-432 B.C. Pentelic marble The British Museum ”

didoofcarthage: “ Chariot group from the south frieze of the Parthenon The Acropolis, Athens, Greece, c. 438-432 B.C. Pentelic marble The British Museum ”

4th century BC Greek frieze with added 13th century cross on the exterior of Panagia Gorgoepikoos Church, Athens

4th century BC Greek frieze with added 13th century cross on the exterior of Panagia Gorgoepikoos Church, Athens

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