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Philip Beesley- Hylozoic Veil  made of hundreds of thousands of lightweight digitally fabricated components fitted with microprocessors and sensors. The glass-like fragility of this artificial forest is created by an intricate lattice of small transparent acrylic meshwork links, covered with a network of interactive mechanical fronds, filters, and proximity sensors.

Philip Beesley- Hylozoic Veil made of hundreds of thousands of lightweight digitally fabricated components fitted with microprocessors and sensors. The glass-like fragility of this artificial forest is created by an intricate lattice of small transparent acrylic meshwork links, covered with a network of interactive mechanical fronds, filters, and proximity sensors.

Philip Beesley's Hylozoic series, an interactive exhibition featured at the 2010 Biennale. The work was extremely beautiful and interesting but in my opinion failed on the interactive aspect in a few ways. Audiences had to be told beforehand very specifically how to interact and handle the hanging sculptures, otherwise they would not know what to do. The sculptures were quite fragile and were not child friendly as many of them broke over the course of the exhibition from rough handling.

Philip Beesley's Hylozoic series, an interactive exhibition featured at the 2010 Biennale. The work was extremely beautiful and interesting but in my opinion failed on the interactive aspect in a few ways. Audiences had to be told beforehand very specifically how to interact and handle the hanging sculptures, otherwise they would not know what to do. The sculptures were quite fragile and were not child friendly as many of them broke over the course of the exhibition from rough handling.

Venice Architecture Biennale 2010: Toronto architect Philip Beesley has installed a forest of acrylic fronds that move as though breathing inside the Canada pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale.

Venice Architecture Biennale 2010: Toronto architect Philip Beesley has installed a forest of acrylic fronds that move as though breathing inside the Canada pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale.

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