Barry Mill is a magnificent example of Scotland's industrial heritage. It is set in a secluded area beside the Barry Burn, with a working mill, ladeside and burnside walks, and guided tours. Grain from a local farm is stored in jute sacks which are moved  vertically using the water-powered sack hoist. The grain is milled using a pair of French burr stones that were made in Edinburgh  c1880. The youngest piece of equipment is a grain elevator dated 1910.

Barry Mill is a magnificent example of Scotland's industrial heritage. It is set in a secluded area beside the Barry Burn, with a working mill, ladeside and burnside walks, and guided tours. Grain from a local farm is stored in jute sacks which are moved vertically using the water-powered sack hoist. The grain is milled using a pair of French burr stones that were made in Edinburgh c1880. The youngest piece of equipment is a grain elevator dated 1910.

The Angus Folk Museum's huge collection encapsulates a way of life that is now fading from living memory, when horses provided the power, spinning and weaving were universal skills and communities were of necessity close-knit and self supporting. There's a collection of antiquarian farming machinery and a horse-drawn hearse on display.

The Angus Folk Museum's huge collection encapsulates a way of life that is now fading from living memory, when horses provided the power, spinning and weaving were universal skills and communities were of necessity close-knit and self supporting. There's a collection of antiquarian farming machinery and a horse-drawn hearse on display.

Step into Weaver’s Cottage and be transported back to the days when Kilbarchan was at the heart of the thriving Scottish textile industry. This restored historic 18th-century cottage near Glasgow vividly recreates the living and working conditions of a typical handloom weaver. The atmospheric, low-beamed rooms are filled with period furniture and household objects, displayed to give a real feel for the everyday life of the families who lived and worked here.

Step into Weaver’s Cottage and be transported back to the days when Kilbarchan was at the heart of the thriving Scottish textile industry. This restored historic 18th-century cottage near Glasgow vividly recreates the living and working conditions of a typical handloom weaver. The atmospheric, low-beamed rooms are filled with period furniture and household objects, displayed to give a real feel for the everyday life of the families who lived and worked here.

Mary Barbour (1875-1958) Political activist of Red Clydeside- legend from Kilbarchan

Mary Barbour (1875-1958) Political activist of Red Clydeside- legend from Kilbarchan

8th July 1936: The King's kilt maker Willie Meikle weaves a tartan on his loom in Kilbarchan. (Photo by Martin/Fox Photos/Getty Images)

8th July 1936: The King's kilt maker Willie Meikle weaves a tartan on his loom in Kilbarchan. (Photo by Martin/Fox Photos/Getty Images)

Souter Johnnie's house, Kirkoswald

Souter Johnnie's house, Kirkoswald

Barry Mill is now one of only a tiny handful of mills still powered by water, and we believe that it is one of only three in the whole of Scotland where visitors may still see the traditional way of milling. The mill was at the heart of this small rural community, providing work and social opportunities for local people. Until as late as 1982 the mill was still at work - the last of its kind in Angus - producing oatmeal and finally animal feed.

Barry Mill is now one of only a tiny handful of mills still powered by water, and we believe that it is one of only three in the whole of Scotland where visitors may still see the traditional way of milling. The mill was at the heart of this small rural community, providing work and social opportunities for local people. Until as late as 1982 the mill was still at work - the last of its kind in Angus - producing oatmeal and finally animal feed.

Inside Souter Johnnie's workshop

Inside Souter Johnnie's workshop

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