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Sousse pottery - Wish I would have bought more of this last time I was in Tunisie

Tunisian pottery found in a bazaar in Sousse city Garnki do kuskus na bazarze w Sousse

African  Water vessel. A ceramic jar which is  worn by women on their backs to fetch water from wells and springs and then to store it in their homes.  Ouadhias culture. Great Kabylia, Algeria

Algerian water vessel: A ceramic jar which is worn by women on their backs to fetch water from wells and springs and then to store it in their homes.

Sylvian Meschia, spent his childhood in Algeria where he learned about Arabic calligraphy and Berber culture. An avid reader of poetry and an interest of Oriental art has recently inspired him to create work which combines Japanese brushwork with Arabic calligraphy. This work expresses his core belief in the fusion of people and cultures.

p-lanet-e-arth:Sylvian Meschia, spent his childhood in Algeria where he learned about Arabic calligraphy and Berber culture. An avid reader of poetry and an interest of Oriental art has recently inspired him to create work which combines Japanese.

Gorgeous gazelle. Carved into a rock in the Sahara when it was green enough to support elephants, gazelle, cattle, rhinoceri, giraffes, and other large animals. 8000 - 3000 BC.

ancientart: “ Prehistoric petroglyph depicting a possibly sleeping antelope, located at Tin Taghirt on the Tassili n’Ajjer in southern Algeria. Photo courtesy & taken by Linus Wolf ”

Les tajines by David Augustin, via Flickr - fabulous slow cooker without a plug and pretty on the table.

A tangine, aka a slow cooker without a plug. They come in such vibrant colours and patterns! This is what the chicken/lamb tangine dish is named after.

Djanet, Algeria. Showing a man with bow and a dog from the pastoral period of Saharan art. #africanrockart http://africanrockart.org

Rock art showing a man with bow and a dog, from the pastoral period of Saharan art.

Africa | Water Jar. Kabyle peoples, Algeria | 19th century | Ceramic and pigment | To this day, Kabyle women coil and decorate pottery with beautiful, geometric designs for their own household use and for sale. Kabyle women handbuild vessels of various sizes and shapes for holding water, milk and oil, for cooking and eating food and for making oil lamps.

Ceramic with red and black pigments. To this day, Kabyle women coil and decorate pottery with beautiful, geometric designs for their own household use and for sale

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