Explore Kingston University, Feminism and more!

Ruwayda Mustafah Rabar is a freelance British-Kurdish writer based in London, and is currently completing her law degree at Kingston University. She has engaged in numerous multicultural and interfaith dialogues to promote plurality and understanding. And has spoken at numerous conferences, academic institutions on issues related to gender, feminism, and Middle Eastern women.

Ruwayda Mustafah Rabar is a freelance British-Kurdish writer based in London, and is currently completing her law degree at Kingston University. She has engaged in numerous multicultural and interfaith dialogues to promote plurality and understanding. And has spoken at numerous conferences, academic institutions on issues related to gender, feminism, and Middle Eastern women.

Meet Park Cannon, the 24-Year-Old Black, Queer Woman Elected to the Georgia House

Meet Park Cannon, the 24-Year-Old Black, Queer Woman Elected to the Georgia House

Lena Chen is a Boston-based writer, activist, and media commentator. She has contributed personal essays and reportage on sex and gender to publications such as The American Prospect, The Boston Globe Magazine, The Sydney Morning Herald, Glamour, and Salon. She is currently working on her first book, a fictionalized memoir based on her experiences writing the now-defunct Sex and the Ivy.

Lena Chen is a Boston-based writer, activist, and media commentator. She has contributed personal essays and reportage on sex and gender to publications such as The American Prospect, The Boston Globe Magazine, The Sydney Morning Herald, Glamour, and Salon. She is currently working on her first book, a fictionalized memoir based on her experiences writing the now-defunct Sex and the Ivy.

Named one of twelve women to watch in 2012 by the Daily Muse, Emily is an international leader in the anti-street-harassment movement. In 2005, at the age of 24, she co-founded Hollaback! (iHollaback.org) in New York City, and in 2010 she became the first full-time executive director. In 2008, Emily won the Stonewall Women’s Award, in 2010 the Women’s Media Center selected her as one of thirty “Women Making History”  She was named one of 20 women “leading the way” by the Huffington Post.

Named one of twelve women to watch in 2012 by the Daily Muse, Emily is an international leader in the anti-street-harassment movement. In 2005, at the age of 24, she co-founded Hollaback! (iHollaback.org) in New York City, and in 2010 she became the first full-time executive director. In 2008, Emily won the Stonewall Women’s Award, in 2010 the Women’s Media Center selected her as one of thirty “Women Making History” She was named one of 20 women “leading the way” by the Huffington Post.

Meet the 24-year-old who could change how the US handles sexual assaults - State Department official Amanda Nguyen drove forward the Sexual Assault Survivors’ Rights Act after fighting not to have her own rape kit destroyed

Meet the 24-year-old who could change how the US handles sexual assaults

Meet the 24-year-old who could change how the US handles sexual assaults - State Department official Amanda Nguyen drove forward the Sexual Assault Survivors’ Rights Act after fighting not to have her own rape kit destroyed

Vanessa Valenti is a New York-based blogger, speaker and online strategist. She is the co-founder and managing editor of the award-winning blog, Feministing.com. Since its inception in 2004, Feministing has been a pioneer in connecting feminism with new media, becoming the largest online feminist community in the world. Vanessa is also a co-founder and partner of Valenti Martin Media, a next generation consultancy that harnesses the power of online communication to elevate social change.

Vanessa Valenti is a New York-based blogger, speaker and online strategist. She is the co-founder and managing editor of the award-winning blog, Feministing.com. Since its inception in 2004, Feministing has been a pioneer in connecting feminism with new media, becoming the largest online feminist community in the world. Vanessa is also a co-founder and partner of Valenti Martin Media, a next generation consultancy that harnesses the power of online communication to elevate social change.

"Why Society Still Needs Feminism" - great read. Excerpt: "Because to men, a key is a device to open something. For women, it’s a weapon we hold between our fingers when we’re walking alone at night."

Why Society Still Needs Feminism Because to men, a key is a device to open something. For women, it’s a weapon we hold between our fingers when we’re walking alone at night. Because the biggest insult for a guy is to be called a “pussy,” a “little bitch” or a “girl.” From here on out, being called a “pussy” is an effing badge of honor. Because last month, my politics professor asked the class if women should have equal representation in the Supreme Court, and only three out of 42 people raised their hands. Because rape jokes are still a thing. Because despite being equally broke college kids, guys are still expected to pay for dates, drinks and flowers. Because as a legit student group, Campus Fellowship does not allow women to lead anything involving men. Look, I know Eve was dumb about the whole apple and snake thing, but I think we can agree having a vagina does not directly impact your ability to lead a college organization. Because it’s assumed that if you are nice to a girl, she owes you sex — therefore, if she turns you down, she’s a bitch who’s put you in the “friend zone.” Sorry, bro, women are not machines you put kindness coins into until sex falls out. Because only 29 percent of American women identify as feminist, and in the words of author Caitlin Moran, “What part of ‘liberation for women’ is not for you? Is it freedom to vote? The right not to be owned by the man you marry? The campaign for equal pay? Did all that good shit get on your nerves? Or were you just drunk at the time of the survey?” Because when people hear the term feminist, they honestly think of women burning bras. Dude, have you ever bought a bra? No one would burn them because they’re freaking expensive. Because Rush Limbaugh. Because we now have a record number of women in the Senate … which is a measly 20 out of 100. Congrats, USA, we’ve gone up to 78th place for women’s political representation, still below China, Rwanda and Iraq. Because recently I had a discussion with a couple of well-meaning Drake University guys, and they literally could not fathom how catcalling a woman walking down University Avenue is creepy and sexist. Could. Not. Fathom. Because on average, the tenured male professors at Drake make more than the tenured female professors. Because more people on campus complain about chalked statistics regarding sexual assault than complain about the existence of sexual assault. Priorities? Have them. Because 138 House Republicans voted against the Violence Against Women Act. All 138 felt it shouldn’t provide support for Native women, LGBT people or immigrant women. I’m kind of confused by this, because I thought LGBT people and women of color were also human beings. Weird, right? Because a girl was roofied last semester at a local campus bar, and I heard someone say they think she should have been more careful. Being drugged is her fault, not the fault of the person who put drugs in her drink? Because Chris Brown beat Rihanna so badly she was hospitalized, yet he still has fans and bestselling songs and a tattoo of an abused woman on his neck. Because out of 7 billion people on the planet, more than 1 billion women will be raped or beaten in their lifetimes. Women and girls have their clitorises cut out, acid thrown on them and broken bottles shoved up them as an act of war. Every second of every day. Every corner of the Earth. Because the other day, another friend of mine told me she was raped, and I can no longer count on both my hands the number of friends who have told me they’ve been sexually assaulted. Words can’t express how scared I am that I’m getting used to this. Because a brief survey of reality will tell you that we do not live in a world that values all people equally and that sucks in real, very scary ways. Because you know we live in a sexist world when an awesome thing with the name “feminism” has a weird connotation. Because if I have kids someday, I want my son to be able to have emotions and play dress up, and I want my daughter to climb trees and care more about what’s in her head than what’s on it. Because I don’t want her to carry keys between her fingers at night to protect herself. Because feminism is for everybody, and this is your official invitation.

"Why Society Still Needs Feminism" - great read. Excerpt: "Because to men, a key is a device to open something. For women, it’s a weapon we hold between our fingers when we’re walking alone at night."

A high-ranking police officer was reassigned after the teen called attention to his tweets, which she said showed “entrenched racism.”

This 17-year-old is a rising voice in Baltimore’s Black Lives Matter movement

A high-ranking police officer was reassigned after the teen called attention to his tweets, which she said showed “entrenched racism.”

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