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"Enter Sandman" (2000): Upon the addition of a new scoreboard in Lane Stadium before the 2000 season, Virginia Tech's athletics marketing team decided to begin playing an entrance video on the scoreboard. The group considered "Welcome to the Jungle" by Guns N' Roses and "Sirius" by the Alan Parsons Project before settling on Metallica's "Enter Sandman," which was first played on Aug. 27, 2000, for the season opener against Georgia Tech. The game was canceled because of lightning.

"Enter Sandman" (2000): Upon the addition of a new scoreboard in Lane Stadium before the 2000 season, Virginia Tech's athletics marketing team decided to begin playing an entrance video on the scoreboard. The group considered "Welcome to the Jungle" by Guns N' Roses and "Sirius" by the Alan Parsons Project before settling on Metallica's "Enter Sandman," which was first played on Aug. 27, 2000, for the season opener against Georgia Tech. The game was canceled because of lightning.

Gordon Wildes, a 1935 graduate, and Evy Law are under the arch at the 1934 Ring Dance.

Gordon Wildes, a 1935 graduate, and Evy Law are under the arch at the 1934 Ring Dance.

Couples are presented at the 1966 Ring Dance.

Couples are presented at the 1966 Ring Dance.

Pranks (1872-1925): Boredom was a constant during the early days of Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College (today's Virginia Tech). To alleviate the tedium, cadets turned to a standby from ancient times—pranks. No one recorded the first prank, but one of the earliest was the magical transformation of President Charles L.C. Minor's red cow into a white one. Other early standards included sending a roommate's belongings home to his girlfriend or staging a fake duel.

Pranks (1872-1925): Boredom was a constant during the early days of Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College (today's Virginia Tech). To alleviate the tedium, cadets turned to a standby from ancient times—pranks. No one recorded the first prank, but one of the earliest was the magical transformation of President Charles L.C. Minor's red cow into a white one. Other early standards included sending a roommate's belongings home to his girlfriend or staging a fake duel.

This photo is from a Ring Dance in the late 1960s.

This photo is from a Ring Dance in the late

Couples stop dancing to pose for a photo at the 1987 Ring Dance.

Couples stop dancing to pose for a photo at the 1987 Ring Dance.

Celebrating graduation in 1970.

Celebrating graduation in

Female African-American regimental commander (2006): Christina Royal (sociology '06)

Female African-American regimental commander (2006): Christina Royal (sociology '06)

World-record pole vaulter (1977): Irene Spieker (health and physical education '78) was the first woman in the world to pole vault higher than 8 feet, setting an unofficial world record at 8' 1/4" during the indoor Mason Dixon Games in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1977. Spieker, Tech's premier female runner with school records in the indoor and outdoor mile, 1,500 meters, and 3,000 meters, broke the national record five times and cleared 10 feet in the 1979 Mason Dixon Games.

World-record pole vaulter (1977): Irene Spieker (health and physical education '78) was the first woman in the world to pole vault higher than 8 feet, setting an unofficial world record at 8' 1/4" during the indoor Mason Dixon Games in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1977. Spieker, Tech's premier female runner with school records in the indoor and outdoor mile, 1,500 meters, and 3,000 meters, broke the national record five times and cleared 10 feet in the 1979 Mason Dixon Games.

African-American regimental commander (1985): Derek A. Jeffries (architecture '87)

African-American regimental commander Derek A.

Woman commissioned (1959): During commissioning exercises in Miles Stadium in June 1959, Patricia Ann Miller (general home economics '59) received a commission in the U.S. Army Women's Medical Specialist Corps as a dietitian. She had been denied admittance into the Corps of Cadets throughout her 12 quarters on campus.

Woman commissioned (1959): During commissioning exercises in Miles Stadium in June 1959, Patricia Ann Miller (general home economics '59) received a commission in the U.S. Army Women's Medical Specialist Corps as a dietitian. She had been denied admittance into the Corps of Cadets throughout her 12 quarters on campus.

Asphalt walks (1971): The first asphalt walks across the Drillfield—two of them—were poured during the summer of 1971.

Asphalt walks The first asphalt walks across the Drillfield—two of them—were poured during the summer of

Moss Arts Center performance (2013): On Nov. 1, 2013, the Philip Glass Ensemble christened the Moss Arts Center's Anne and Ellen Fife Theatre in the Street and Davis Performance Hall with contemporary music accompanying the film "Powaqqatsi: Life in Transformation." The Blacksburg Children's Chorale joined the ensemble for the sold-out performance.

Moss Arts Center performance (2013): On Nov. 1, 2013, the Philip Glass Ensemble christened the Moss Arts Center's Anne and Ellen Fife Theatre in the Street and Davis Performance Hall with contemporary music accompanying the film "Powaqqatsi: Life in Transformation." The Blacksburg Children's Chorale joined the ensemble for the sold-out performance.

The presentation of the rings at the 1972 Ring Dance.

The presentation of the rings at the 1972 Ring Dance.

Touchdown in Miles Stadium (1926): At the first game in Miles Stadium on Sept. 25, 1926, sportswriters paid considerable attention to the "educated toe" of James Bushell "Scotty" McArthur, who kicked two field goals. Also noted in the accounts is Tech's "Pony Express" backfield, which ran roughshod over Roanoke College in the 47-0 romp. Frank Woodfin Peake scored three TDs, and Herbert Macauley McEver scored once, but there is no mention of who scored that first touchdown.

Touchdown in Miles Stadium (1926): At the first game in Miles Stadium on Sept. 25, 1926, sportswriters paid considerable attention to the "educated toe" of James Bushell "Scotty" McArthur, who kicked two field goals. Also noted in the accounts is Tech's "Pony Express" backfield, which ran roughshod over Roanoke College in the 47-0 romp. Frank Woodfin Peake scored three TDs, and Herbert Macauley McEver scored once, but there is no mention of who scored that first touchdown.

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