Explore Eye Chart, Melbourne Museum, and more!

Lemur-Like Toes Complicate Human Lineage - Live Science, article by Jennifer Welsh. A 47-million-year-old primate may have been a fashionista of sorts, as new analysis of the fossil suggests it sported grooming claws. Image: Notharctus tenebrosus fossil, American Museum of Natural History.

Lemur-Like Toes Complicate Human Lineage

Lemur-Like Toes Complicate Human Lineage - Live Science, article by Jennifer Welsh. A 47-million-year-old primate may have been a fashionista of sorts, as new analysis of the fossil suggests it sported grooming claws. Image: Notharctus tenebrosus fossil, American Museum of Natural History.

The six-month-old female calf discovered in the permafrost of northern Siberia by a reindeer herder is one of the best-preserved mammoths ever found. Its trunk and eyes were still intact, while it still had some fur left on its body. Its tail and ear were bitten off, probably in a fight with a predator or another mammoth, but there are few clues as to how it died.

The six-month-old female calf discovered in the permafrost of northern Siberia by a reindeer herder is one of the best-preserved mammoths ever found. Its trunk and eyes were still intact, while it.

Lyuba is a female woolly mammoth calf who died 41,800 years ago at the age of 30 to 35 days. Lyuba is believed to have suffocated by inhaling mud while bogged down in deep mud in the bed of a river her herd was crossing. Lyuba appears to have been healthy at the time of her death. By examining Lyuba's teeth, researchers hope to gain insight into what caused Ice Age mammals, including the mammoths, to become extinct at the end of the Pleistocene era around 10,000 years ago

Lyuba is a female woolly mammoth calf who died years ago at the age of 30 to 35 days. Lyuba is believed to have suffocated by inhaling mud while bogged down in deep mud in the bed of a river her herd was crossing. Lyuba appears to have been healthy

Pterodactyl Skeleton

The skeleton of a pterodactyl, the prehistoric winged dinosaur.

Ancient Cave Lion Bones Reveal Big Cats’ Diet - Article by Andrew Curry. A quarter larger than today’s lions, the European cave lion was one of the biggest cats around 12,000 years ago. Now, an unusually sophisticated analysis of its bones is revealing what these creatures ate—and why they may have disappeared. Read more: http://www.wired.com/2011/11/cave-lion-diet/

Ancient Cave Lion Bones Reveal Big Cats' Diet

An unusually sophisticated analysis of cave lion bones is revealing what the creatures ate and why they may have disappeared.

Tyrannosaurus Rex

DINOSAURICON T

Mathematica is helping paleontologists to more accurately understand just how big dinosaurs were. Who knew we had so much more to learn?

Pinterest
Search