*A FINE AND RARE BRONZE FIGURE OF THE SEATED GANESH ON A THRONE. India, Pala period, 11th c. Height 16 cm.

*A FINE AND RARE BRONZE FIGURE OF THE SEATED GANESH ON A THRONE. India, Pala period, 11th c. Height 16 cm.

Tara, Pala Sena period, 10th c., India. BUDDHA / STATUES / ICONS : More @ FOSTERGINGER @ Pinterest

Tara, Pala Sena period, 10th c., India. BUDDHA / STATUES / ICONS : More @ FOSTERGINGER @ Pinterest

Uma-Mahesvara   E. Bengal  9th c.  bronze

Uma-Mahesvara E. Bengal 9th c. bronze

This sculpture represents an esoteric form of Manjushri, the Bodhisattva of Transcendent Wisdom. He has three heads and six arms; four hold a bow and arrow, a sword, and a lotus, while the remaining two hold vajras (thunderbolt scepters) and are crossed at the chest in an esoteric gesture (mudra) identifying supreme wisdom

This sculpture represents an esoteric form of Manjushri, the Bodhisattva of Transcendent Wisdom. He has three heads and six arms; four hold a bow and arrow, a sword, and a lotus, while the remaining two hold vajras (thunderbolt scepters) and are crossed at the chest in an esoteric gesture (mudra) identifying supreme wisdom

Standing Vishnu with His Consorts, Lakshmi and Sarasvati | India (Bihar) | Pala period | The Met

Standing Vishnu with His Consorts, Lakshmi and Sarasvati | India (Bihar) | Pala period | The Met

Vishnu stands in perfect symmetry (samapada), the protector of cosmic order. In an iconographic convention unique to medieval Bengal, he is accompanied by the goddesses Lakshmi, holding a fly-whisk (camara) and lotus (padma), and Sarasvati, playing a vina, rather than by his wives Sri Devi and Bhu Devi

Vishnu stands in perfect symmetry (samapada), the protector of cosmic order. In an iconographic convention unique to medieval Bengal, he is accompanied by the goddesses Lakshmi, holding a fly-whisk (camara) and lotus (padma), and Sarasvati, playing a vina, rather than by his wives Sri Devi and Bhu Devi

This sculpture portrays the sixteen-armed form of the goddess Durga as the slayer of the buffalo demon Mahisha. The array of arms, each displaying a weapon, creates a kinetic energy in the image, no doubt all the more powerful when contemplated in a shrine dimly illuminated by oil lamps

This sculpture portrays the sixteen-armed form of the goddess Durga as the slayer of the buffalo demon Mahisha. The array of arms, each displaying a weapon, creates a kinetic energy in the image, no doubt all the more powerful when contemplated in a shrine dimly illuminated by oil lamps

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